No pipelines, no tankers, no problem 3

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MegB
No pipelines, no tankers, no problem 3

Continued from here.

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epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Several Protectors were released from a one-week jail sentence including (From left) Charlotte Gyoba, Susan Lambert former BC Teachers’ Federation president, Jean Swanson Order of Canada recipient, Heather Martin-McNab and Kathleen Flaherty.

Martin N.

All First Nations agreements now in place for Coastal GasLink pipeline

Alaska Highway News

SEPTEMBER 13, 2018 08:12 AM

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coastalgaslink-agreements

Indigenous band agreements in place along the Coastal GasLink Pipeline route. Supplied

TransCanada says it has signed project agreements with all 20 indigenous communities along its Coastal GasLink pipeline route from Northeast B.C. to Kitimat.

Support for the agreements comes from both traditional and hereditary leaders in the communities, the company said in a news release Thursday.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Order of Canada recipients urge government to rethink Trans Mountain expansion

Today, 42 Order of Canada recipients urged the federal government to cancel the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion and instead focus on the transition to a clean energy economy.

In an open letter to Canadians, the group, which includes prominent Canadians like Bonnie Sherr Klein, David Suzuki, Robert Bateman, Joy Kogawa and Gabor Maté, says the recent Federal Court of Appeal ruling is an opportunity to rethink the pipeline, including the risks to Pacific Coast orca whales. Other recipients who have signed the letter include Dempsey Bob, George Bowering, Lorna Crozier, Alma Lee, Ann Mortifee, Jean Swanson, Dorothy Grant, Raffi Cavoukian, Libby Davies and several others.

“We must be prepared to act boldly for our grandchildren’s future if we are to save our planet. What is possibly worth more?” said Bonnie Sherr Klein, film-maker and Officer of the Order of Canada. Sherr Klein, who is the mother of author Naomi Klein and Seth Klein, the former B.C. director of the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, said the group came together through word of mouth — it was a matter of Google searches and phone calls to people they knew.

"The interesting thing is people were kind of waiting for an opportunity to do something," she said. "People love their country and desire to do something for their country."

quote:

"We agree with the Prime Minister that a healthy economy and protecting the environment are not mutually exclusive," the group letter states. "We propose that as a nation we invest in the transition to clean energy and a diversified economy as rapidly as possible. Working together, business, the labour movement, the non-profit sector, religious organizations, and government can generate long-term sustainable jobs in the field of clean energy. Re-training for those who suffer immediate job loss in this transition should become a public policy priority."

"We believe it is critical to add our voices to the many Canadians, young and old, who also desire a better country," the letter says. "While we respect those who differ, we call on our government to cancel the pipeline expansion. In its place we need to develop a comprehensive energy transition plan that is commensurate with the crisis of climate change."

Martin N.

CALGARY – Two major Chinese companies and a group of Albertan Indigenous communities are proposing to build a new oilsands refinery and petrochemical complex in the province, according to a press release issued by consultants Stantec Inc.

Beijing-based and state-owned China Petroleum & Chemical Corp., better known as Sinopec, along with China Construction Industrial & Energy Co. Ltd. and a consortium of Alberta Indigenous groups signed an agreement with the Edmonton-based engineering and design firm Stantec Inc. on Thursday to pursue permits for a new bitumen refinery.

According to a Stantec release, the partnership of Sinopec, China Construction and the Indigenous groups will be called SinoCan Global, which will begin seeking permits to build a 167,000-barrels-per-day bitumen refinery and petrochemical complex north of Edmonton.

https://business.financialpost.com/commodities/chinese-firms-and-indigen...

Great to see Indigenous initiative in the economy. Strong participation will allow them to lift their nations out of the morass of the Indian Act.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..lots of public posturing by politicos these days. cons blame libs, libs blame cons and notley alta blames them both. all trying to pretend they are in charge of the situation.  

Trans Mountain pipeline plan could be guided by former judge

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The Liberals intend to announce the next steps before the end of September.

The government wants to have the pipeline’s fate decided within the next six to eight months before the next federal election and also before Alberta’s provincial election in May.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Duty to consult First Nations was clear. How did the government miss the mark?

quote:

While some called for the protection of sacred and valued ecosystems, governance systems and cultures, others called for the protection of workers in Alberta and Canada's economy. Some demanded growth in the oil industry, while others demanded clean energy initiatives and the recognition of Indigenous sovereignty over unceded territories.

A thick layer of confusion raised its lazy head, along with questions about how well Canadians and political leaders understand Indigenous rights as defined in Canada’s Constitution (not to mention within Indigenous legal orders) and how major industrial projects might proceed in the future.

How did a government so adamant that this pipeline proposal was a matter of "national interest" that it bought the project outright, fail to meet its constitutional obligations? How did a government, publicly so eager to reconcile with Indigenous nations and fix the flaws of past governments, fail to succeed where its predecessor did not?

National Observer spoke with an environmental assessment expert, three lawyers well-versed in the “duty to consult” and an Indigenous land defender to untangle the issues.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

BREAKING: Trudeau government asks NEB to redo Trans Mountain decision

Natural Resources Minister Amarjeet Sohi announced Friday in Halifax that the Trudeau government is asking the National Energy Board to redo its review of the Trans Mountain oil pipeline expansion project that was struck down by the courts this summer.

The NEB will now have 22 weeks to "complete a thorough and prompt review" of the decision and deliver its new report. That timeframe would place the new deadline on Friday, Feb. 22, 2019.

"We are confident that this plan will allow us to meet the highest standards that Canadians expect when it comes to protecting the environment," said Sohi. "Today's decision is one important step to move forward following the court's decision."

The minister announced the new review alongside Fisheries and Oceans Minister Jonathan Wilkinson on the sidelines of the G7 meetings that have been taking place this week in the east coast city.

New 'marine technical advisor' to be sent to NEB

The Federal Court of Appeal quashed the government’s approval of the Trans Mountain expansion project on Aug. 30 after concluding that Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s cabinet made its decision without considering all evidence and failed in its legal duty to consult First Nations.

The unanimous court ruling said the NEB made a “critical error” when it decided not to include oil tanker traffic in the scope of its project....

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..in this piece there is video of the press conference re: notley response to the feds plan on the neb (post #8). it pretty much lays out both governments' stategies going forward. the video actually begins about 1.5 min in. 

Notley vows to 'engage ferociously' if feds slip from Trans Mountain review timeline