Canada Federal Election October 21, 2019

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NorthReport

Trudeau is turning out to be the Number One purveyor of Fake News in Canada

Audit exposes Canadian Climate failures

https://www.straight.com/news/1052966/david-suzuki-audit-exposes-canadian-climate-failures

Cody87

Hmmm. I now remember a spat between Trudeau and Suzuki where Trudeau allegedly told Suzuki to stop with the "sanctimonious crap." In hindsight, that's really funny coming from Trudeau.

progressive17 progressive17's picture

Although I am no fan of Justin Trudeau, I am suspicious of David Suzuki's financial agenda. I think there is money changing hands in exchange for blessings, in a form of environmental simony. I think David Suzuki is a sacred cow, and it is time for a BBQ.

NorthReport

How much more nonsense can Canadians tolerate from our current wet behind the ears prime minister? He must take Canadians for fools!

https://thetyee.ca/Opinion/2018/04/04/Trudeau-Pipeline-Smoke-Mirrors/

NorthReport

New Canadian study explains why working class should be angry

 

An angry (white) working class, which has not experienced the benefits of trade and globalization, provided Donald Trump with his margin of victory in a few key states that had not voted Republican in decades.

That's what most who analyzed the results of last Tuesday's vote are saying.

Highly unionized populations in places such as Erie County Pennsylvania and Macomb County Michigan were so disaffected and angry that they threw their lot in with a bizarre billionaire, whom they don't particularly like.

Trump's claim that he cares about the forgotten people, who have been penalized by bad trade deals, Wall Street and shadowy elites, may sound entirely disingenuous to many of us.

Nonetheless, it somehow worked with voters to whom the other side offered scant hope, once Bernie Sanders was out of the picture.

A newly released study by the Canadian Centre for the Study of Living Standards (CSLS) might explain some of that working class anger.

The study's innocuous sounding title is: Labour Productivity and Real Earnings in Canada, 1976-2014. But its conclusions are almost explosive.

It shows that in Canada, the productivity of labour -- the amount workers produce per unit of effort -- went up by over one per cent per year over the 38 years between 1976 and 2014.

The average worker's earnings, however, barely budged over that same period. The rise in wages was less than one-tenth of one per cent per year. Put differently, the rise in productivity was more than 10 times that of earnings.

In the U.S., the annual rise in productivity over the past three decades has been 1.63 per cent. During that same period, earnings, as in Canada, rose at a fraction of one per cent per year, at 0.15 per cent per year to be exact.

Hollowing out of the middle class

"Canadian labour is more productive than ever before," the CSLS study says, "But there is a pervasive sense among Canadians that the living standards of the 'middle class' have been stagnating."

The study's authors identify two factors that explain the gap between rising productivity and stagnant incomes.

One is the hollowing out of the middle class. For the period 1976-2014, there was a measure of income growth, but it was almost all at the bottom and the top of the earnings ladder.  The vast majority in the middle were left out.

The other factor is that the bosses have been keeping an increasing share of enhanced productivity for themselves. As the study puts it:

"Between 1976 and 2014, labour's share of aggregate income declined from 59.9 per cent to 53.3 per cent. This decline was accompanied by a corresponding increase in capital's share of income."

The study’s authors say that the concrete causes of these phenomena are outside their scope, but they do offer what they call plausible explanations for the hollowing out of the middle-income group and the decline in labour's share of total income.

They put the blame on globalization, technological change and institutional changes.

The growth of globalization has "allowed capital to seek the highest returns globally and, at the same time, has brought workers in Canada's traded goods sector into competition with the workers of low-wage countries." In other words, trade deals do indeed benefit corporations, but they often also weaken workers' rights with a race to the bottom.

Robotics and computer technology, the study's authors note, have replaced people with machines, eliminating production-line work, "computation-intensive white-collar work" and other routine technical tasks that once provided good middle-income jobs. Technological change has also weakened the bargaining power of workers, leading to an increasingly part-time, Uber-ized world.

And one of the biggest institutional changes has been a sharp decline in the unionization of workers. That decline has been steady in Canada, but much steeper and more dramatic in the U.S. 

Forces behind stagnating middle incomes are not likely to disappear

The Centre for the Study of Living Standards points out that the unequal distribution of income growth is neither an inevitable nor irreparable fact of life. The Centre's economists argue that it is not too late for "policy to be used to adjust that distribution." And the fact that productivity is growing, the study's authors say, should make the task of devising new policies easier, not harder.

"It is easier," the study says, "to ensure that everyone receives a larger slice of the pie when the pie itself is growing."

But that hopeful conclusion comes with a big caveat. The forces that cause stagnating middle incomes are, the study tells us darkly, "unlikely to disappear in the near future."

In the authors' words:

"If anything, the possibilities for further substitution of capital for labour are likely to expand with the advent of self-driving vehicles, self-service technology in retail, automated fast food preparation, and so on. At some point, policymakers will have to grapple with the implications of these changes for the living standards of the middle class."

The policy challenge the CSLS identifies is a serious one, which demands a multi-faceted response.

In the U.S., many voters were sufficiently impressed with the Trump campaign’s brutal and frank description of their economic malaise that they convinced themselves that Trump has serious solutions -- although the real estate developer and reality television personality never enumerated a single one. Rather than policies, he had a slogan: "Make America Great Again."

It will be interesting to see how Trump's working class voters react when he gives key roles in his administration to Wall Street insiders, corporate shills and neo-con ideologues, and then proceeds to implement one of his only tangible ideas: deep tax cuts for upper-income earners and corporations.

In Canada, we can still hope that when confronted with evidence of the sort we find in the CSLS study politicians might make an effort to come up with something more serious. 

Karl Nerenberg is your reporter on the Hill. Please consider supporting his work with a monthly donation SupportKarl on Patreon today for as little as $1 per month!

http://rabble.ca/blogs/bloggers/karl-nerenberg/2016/11/new-canadian-stud...

NorthReport

 

 

How stupid can our Canadian negotiators be!

How a New NAFTA Deal Will Make Us Fat

U.S. is using trade deals to block other countries’ efforts to warn consumers about unhealthy foods.

https://thetyee.ca/Opinion/2018/04/05/How-NAFTA-Deal-Make-Us-Fat/

NorthReport

The "Ugly Canadian" is on the march, Trudeau is its new face

 

The "Ugly Canadian" is on the march, but now with a much prettier face at the helm. Across the planet, Canadian mining companies are in conflict with local communities and usually have the Trudeau government's support.

A slew of disputes have arisen at Canadian run mines in recent weeks:

Last week in northern central Mexico, community members blockaded the main access road to Goldcorp Inc.'s Penasquito mine. They are protesting against the Vancouver-based company for using and contaminating their water without providing alternative sources.

In Northern Ireland two weeks ago, police forced activists out of a Cookstown hotel after they tried to confront representatives from Dalradian Resources. Community groups worry the Toronto firm's proposed gold and silver mine will damage the Owenkillew River Special Area of Conservation.

Last weekend, an Argentinian senator denounced Blue Sky Uranium's exploration in the Patagonia region. Magdalena Odarda said residents living near the planned mine fear the Vancouver company's operations will harm their health.

On Wednesday more than 40 US congresspeople, as well as the Alaska's Governor, criticized the removal of restrictions on mining in Alaska's Bristol Bay region, home to half the world's sockeye salmon production. In May, Northern Dynasty CEO Thomas Collier met the new head of the US Environmental Protection Agency to ask for the lifting of restrictions on its Pebble Mine, which is expected to destroy the region's salmon fishery. In a bid to gain government permission to move forward on the project, the Vancouver firm appointed a former chief of staff at the US Department of the Interior as its new CEO.

At the end of September, hundreds of families were displaced by the Filipino Army to make way for a mine jointly run by Australian and Canadian firms MRL Gold and Egerton Gold. The community in the Batangas Province was blocking a project expected to harm marine biodiversity.

In eastern Madagascar, farmers are in a dispute with DNI Metals over compensation for lands damaged by the Toronto firm.

In August, another person was allegedly killed by Acacia (Barrick Gold) security at its North Mara mine in Tanzania.

Last week, Barrick Gold agreed to pay $20-million to a Chilean a group after a year-long arbitration. The Toronto company had reneged on a $60-million 20-year agreement to compensate communities affected by its Pascua Lama gold, silver and copper project.

In mid-September, Eldorado Gold threatened to suspend its operations in Halkidiki, Greece, if the central government didn't immediately approve permits for its operations. With the local Mayor and most of the community opposed to the mine, the social-democratic Syriza government was investigating whether a flawed technical study by the Vancouver company was a breach of its contract.

And in Guatemala, Indigenous protestors continue to blockade Tahoe Resources' Escobal silver mine despite a mid-September court decision in the company's favour. Fearing for their water, health and land, eight municipalities in the area have voted against the Vancouver firm's project.

The Liberals have largely maintained Stephen Harper's aggressive support for Canada's massive international mining industry. Last month Canada's Trade Minister François-Philippe Champagne backed El Dorado, denouncing the Greek government's "troublesome" permit delays. Canada's Ambassador to Madagascar, Sandra McCadell, appears to have backed DNI Metals during a meeting with that country's mining minister.

As I detailed previously, the Trudeau government recently threw diplomatic weight behind Canada's most controversial mining company in the country where it has committed its worst abuses. Amidst dozens of deaths at Barrick Gold's North Mara mine in Tanzania and an escalating battle over the company's unpaid royalties/tax, Canada's High Commissioner Ian Myles organised a meeting between Barrick Executive Chairman John Thornton and President John Magufuli. After the meeting Myles applauded Barrick's commitment to "the highest standards, fairness and respect for laws and corporate social responsibility."

Two years into their mandate the Trudeau regime has yet to follow through on their repeated promises to rein in Canada's controversial international mining sector. Despite this commitment, they have adopted no measures to restrict public support for Canadian mining companies responsible for significant abuses abroad.

The 'Ugly Canadian' is running roughshod across the globe and pretty boy Justin is its new face.

http://rabble.ca/blogs/bloggers/yves-englers-blog/2017/10/ugly-canadian-...

bekayne

The answer to fake news is old news?

NorthReport
NorthReport
NorthReport
Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Quote:
Sayer claims that this distinction is of "enormous practical importance for both economic growth and wealth distribution." The second meaning is "central to the legitimation of the rich," who are "essentially siphoning off wealth produced by others." These "others" -- workers who are actually producing goods and services -- must generate a surplus for the "investors"; and hence on average must be paid less than the value of what they produce.  

I think Sayer might be plagiarizing a bearded guy.  I'm having a deja vu moment.

JKR

Santa Claus?

Does he even pay those elves?

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

A different Saint.

The one who brings hope to children, according to their needs, and suchlike.  ;)

Sidebar:  I found this sort of nice.  It's gotta get novelty points, if nothing else.

NorthReport
NorthReport

Trudeau cares about First Nations, sure he does. NOT!

At this point I would be surprised if the Liberals win one seat in BC in the next federal election. 

Chiefs join anti-pipeline protests in Burnaby

Grand Chief Stewart Phillip says he believes it’s his responsibility to help stop the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion

Contributed file photo of B.C. Grand Chief Stewart Phillip.

The leader of the Union of British Columbia Indians Chiefs says he’ll keep coming back to the site of anti-pipeline protests in Burnaby until he gets arrested.

Grand Chief Stewart Phillip sat with a coffee cup in his hands between fellow union executive members, Chief Judy Wilson and Chief Bob Chamberlin, at the gates of Kinder Morgan’s worksite on Saturday afternoon.

Phillip, who has been arrested four other times as he fought for Aboriginal rights, says he believes it’s his responsibility to help stop the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion.

Activist and author Naomi Klein also joined the protesters, saying they are sending a message not to the government but to investors that there’s real opposition to the fossil fuel industry in Canada.

Kinder Morgan’s Trans Mountain project is set to twin an existing pipeline, tripling the flow of oil flowing to the B.C. coast from Alberta.

The RCMP say they have arrested about 200 people demonstrating around the Trans Mountain facilities since mid-March, and while most face charges for civil contempt, officers have also made arrests for mischief, obstruction and assault of a police officer.

https://www.northdeltareporter.com/news/chiefs-join-anti-pipeline-protes...

progressive17 progressive17's picture

NorthReport wrote:

The "Ugly Canadian" is on the march, Trudeau is its new face

 

The "Ugly Canadian" is on the march, but now with a much prettier face at the helm. Across the planet, Canadian mining companies are in conflict with local communities and usually have the Trudeau government's support.

A slew of disputes have arisen at Canadian run mines in recent weeks:

Last week in northern central Mexico, community members blockaded the main access road to Goldcorp Inc.'s Penasquito mine. They are protesting against the Vancouver-based company for using and contaminating their water without providing alternative sources.

In Northern Ireland two weeks ago, police forced activists out of a Cookstown hotel after they tried to confront representatives from Dalradian Resources. Community groups worry the Toronto firm's proposed gold and silver mine will damage the Owenkillew River Special Area of Conservation.

Last weekend, an Argentinian senator denounced Blue Sky Uranium's exploration in the Patagonia region. Magdalena Odarda said residents living near the planned mine fear the Vancouver company's operations will harm their health.

On Wednesday more than 40 US congresspeople, as well as the Alaska's Governor, criticized the removal of restrictions on mining in Alaska's Bristol Bay region, home to half the world's sockeye salmon production. In May, Northern Dynasty CEO Thomas Collier met the new head of the US Environmental Protection Agency to ask for the lifting of restrictions on its Pebble Mine, which is expected to destroy the region's salmon fishery. In a bid to gain government permission to move forward on the project, the Vancouver firm appointed a former chief of staff at the US Department of the Interior as its new CEO.

At the end of September, hundreds of families were displaced by the Filipino Army to make way for a mine jointly run by Australian and Canadian firms MRL Gold and Egerton Gold. The community in the Batangas Province was blocking a project expected to harm marine biodiversity.

In eastern Madagascar, farmers are in a dispute with DNI Metals over compensation for lands damaged by the Toronto firm.

In August, another person was allegedly killed by Acacia (Barrick Gold) security at its North Mara mine in Tanzania.

Last week, Barrick Gold agreed to pay $20-million to a Chilean a group after a year-long arbitration. The Toronto company had reneged on a $60-million 20-year agreement to compensate communities affected by its Pascua Lama gold, silver and copper project.

In mid-September, Eldorado Gold threatened to suspend its operations in Halkidiki, Greece, if the central government didn't immediately approve permits for its operations. With the local Mayor and most of the community opposed to the mine, the social-democratic Syriza government was investigating whether a flawed technical study by the Vancouver company was a breach of its contract.

And in Guatemala, Indigenous protestors continue to blockade Tahoe Resources' Escobal silver mine despite a mid-September court decision in the company's favour. Fearing for their water, health and land, eight municipalities in the area have voted against the Vancouver firm's project.

The Liberals have largely maintained Stephen Harper's aggressive support for Canada's massive international mining industry. Last month Canada's Trade Minister François-Philippe Champagne backed El Dorado, denouncing the Greek government's "troublesome" permit delays. Canada's Ambassador to Madagascar, Sandra McCadell, appears to have backed DNI Metals during a meeting with that country's mining minister.

As I detailed previously, the Trudeau government recently threw diplomatic weight behind Canada's most controversial mining company in the country where it has committed its worst abuses. Amidst dozens of deaths at Barrick Gold's North Mara mine in Tanzania and an escalating battle over the company's unpaid royalties/tax, Canada's High Commissioner Ian Myles organised a meeting between Barrick Executive Chairman John Thornton and President John Magufuli. After the meeting Myles applauded Barrick's commitment to "the highest standards, fairness and respect for laws and corporate social responsibility."

Two years into their mandate the Trudeau regime has yet to follow through on their repeated promises to rein in Canada's controversial international mining sector. Despite this commitment, they have adopted no measures to restrict public support for Canadian mining companies responsible for significant abuses abroad.

The 'Ugly Canadian' is running roughshod across the globe and pretty boy Justin is its new face.

http://rabble.ca/blogs/bloggers/yves-englers-blog/2017/10/ugly-canadian-...

These are companies which actually mine gold, which is an original cause of the destruction of the planet and its desertification going back a good 10,000 years. You might consider the ancient Egyptian empire of the Pharaohs to be a gold mining operation. Always follow the money when you are studying history.

Gold mining companies are among the world's worst corporate citizens. They use cyanide, which is extremely toxic in very small quantities. This was invented in Scotland in 1887, and first used in New Zealand in 1889. They routinely commit ecocide, and as we see homicide is done in their names.

There may be only 20 viable gold mining sites left in the world. Yet between London's main and alternative markets, Sydney, and Toronto there are over 2,000 so-called "gold mining companies". Thus for any given gold mining company you invest in, there is only a 1% chance of striking gold, if the governments in those places allow the mining in the first place. And they are increasingly not.

There are many other so-called mining companies which only mine investment capital from suckers playing the TSX Venture Exchange. Really rich people know you don't touch these things with a barge-pole, but a small investor who wants to turn a small amount of money into a nestegg too fast will be prey to these firms.

Caveat Emptor!

NorthReport
NorthReport
alan smithee alan smithee's picture

Looks like the alleged Rotten Right Wing Liberals want to spend billions on housing including social housing.

All the provinces and territories are on board. Excluding Quebec because they are idiots.

https://www.ctvnews.ca/politics/provinces-territories-agree-to-billions-...

NorthReport

More Liberal platitudes

After abdicating their responsibilities in this area for years and years. Wake me up when Canadians are actually benefiting.

NorthReport

One would think so- called progressives would be outraged by Canada’s right-wing orientated mainstream media’s BS but....

https://commonground.ca/vancouver-the-day-the-media-died/

Sean in Ottawa

alan smithee wrote:

Looks like the alleged Rotten Right Wing Liberals want to spend billions on housing including social housing.

All the provinces and territories are on board. Excluding Quebec because they are idiots.

https://www.ctvnews.ca/politics/provinces-territories-agree-to-billions-...

This looks like good news -- let's see the details but it is a good development.

Many people have advocated for this and economists have rightly pointed out that the lack of it is undermining the economy of the country as you need housing where employment can be available otherwise people without work end up in a position where they are kept there.

This is a policy of the NDP as well and it certainly seems like when the Liberals run scared they shore up their left flank. Good to keep the scared if they ahve to be in power at all.

Government is not just a single party but a party reacting to a political context including other parties and non-partisan people who press for needed policy. Sure the Liberals might earn praise for this and it might be deserved but let's not lose sight of the context as well.

As for Quebec - that is a mean remark considering that Quebec usually has the most progressive policies in a number of fronts. They have structures and delivery systems of their own and like to choose where to put efforts. I am not saying it is a good decision to be out of this but calling the government of Quebec which delivers a great deal more than most provinces to their people idiots is quite ignorant.

alan smithee alan smithee's picture

Sean in Ottawa wrote:

alan smithee wrote:

Looks like the alleged Rotten Right Wing Liberals want to spend billions on housing including social housing.

All the provinces and territories are on board. Excluding Quebec because they are idiots.

https://www.ctvnews.ca/politics/provinces-territories-agree-to-billions-...

This looks like good news -- let's see the details but it is a good development.

Many people have advocated for this and economists have rightly pointed out that the lack of it is undermining the economy of the country as you need housing where employment can be available otherwise people without work end up in a position where they are kept there.

This is a policy of the NDP as well and it certainly seems like when the Liberals run scared they shore up their left flank. Good to keep the scared if they ahve to be in power at all.

Government is not just a single party but a party reacting to a political context including other parties and non-partisan people who press for needed policy. Sure the Liberals might earn praise for this and it might be deserved but let's not lose sight of the context as well.

As for Quebec - that is a mean remark considering that Quebec usually has the most progressive policies in a number of fronts. They have structures and delivery systems of their own and like to choose where to put efforts. I am not saying it is a good decision to be out of this but calling the government of Quebec which delivers a great deal more than most provinces to their people idiots is quite ignorant.

Well,yes. This is NDP policy. Niki Ashton told me herself that the NDP supports a national housing strategy. And it's good policy. This country is in dire need of this,particularly our cities.

As for my remark about Quebec,it's not ignorant. Was I referring to Quebecers? That would include me too. It was a swipe at our government. It's disgusting that Quebec wouldn't make this a priority. I live in Montreal. All,and I mean EVERY,new housing project is exclusively condos. They haven't made social housing a priority in at least the last 25 years. I also pass by many social housing units and they are all EMPTY. This is unacceptable. And our government are idiots for not signing on to this with all the other provinces. And using the word 'idiot' is the most polite word I can use for our government. I know a lot of colourful language I can use. I leave it at idiot.

alan smithee alan smithee's picture

NorthReport wrote:

More Liberal platitudes

After abdicating their responsibilities in this area for years and years. Wake me up when Canadians are actually benefiting.

Oh give it up you shameless hyper-partisan. This is NDP policy. Who gives a shit if  the Liberals are making this a priority. It's good policy. Get your head out of your ass.

JKR

alan smithee wrote:

NorthReport wrote:

More Liberal platitudes

After abdicating their responsibilities in this area for years and years. Wake me up when Canadians are actually benefiting.

Oh give it up you shameless hyper-partisan. This is NDP policy. Who gives a shit if  the Liberals are making this a priority. It's good policy. Get your head out of your ass.

Blind hyper-partisans have no credibility.

NorthReport

Trudeau recalls cabinet ministers to Ottawa for emergency meeting in support of Kinder Morgan

https://www.straight.com/news/1055601/trudeau-recalls-cabinet-ministers-...

NorthReport

Canadians were enamoured of the name Trudeau based on PET, but what we have sadly ascertained is that JT is no PET!

As storm clouds gather for Justin Trudeau, sunny ways provide no help

 

Federal regulation to protect the environment, crafted in conjunction with Indigenous communities is an obvious alternative policy direction. It means limiting directly the power of resource-based industries, including Big Oil, to exploit the environment. It also means building support with Canadians for a federal government prepared to act today on behalf of future generations. This will require the kind of performance from the prime minister we have yet to see from Justin Trudeau.

http://rabble.ca/columnists/2018/04/storm-clouds-gather-justin-trudeau-s...

NorthReport

Pipeline politics pit profits against planet

Legally and logically the Trans Mountain pipeline should be built — unless its contribution to global warming is destroying the Earth. The prime minister says fighting climate change need not threaten economic growth. What it really shows is that half measures get you only halfway

 

Harriet Prince, 76, of the Anishinaabe tribe marches last month with Coast Salish Water Protectors and others against the expansion of Texas-based Kinder Morgan's Trans Mountain pipeline project in Burnaby, B.C. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau called on B.C. on Monday to “stop obstructing” construction of a pipeline to Pacific tidewater, vowing that the Trans Mountain project "will get built."At the same time, the premier of neighboring oil-rich but landlocked Alberta, Rachel Notley, warned that the standoff with British Columbia risked triggering a Constitutional crisis.

Harriet Prince, 76, of the Anishinaabe tribe marches last month with Coast Salish Water Protectors and others against the expansion of Texas-based Kinder Morgan's Trans Mountain pipeline project in Burnaby, B.C. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau called on B.C. on Monday to “stop obstructing” construction of a pipeline to Pacific tidewater, vowing that the Trans Mountain project "will get built."At the same time, the premier of neighboring oil-rich but landlocked Alberta, Rachel Notley, warned that the standoff with British Columbia risked triggering a Constitutional crisis.  (JASON REDMOND / AFP/GETTY IMAGES)

By THOMAS WALKOMNational Affairs Columnist

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says this shows that fighting climate change need not threaten economic growth. What it really shows is that half measures get you only halfway.

Government action on the climate front has been so timid that Canada is not on track to meet the carbon reduction targets it agreed to in Paris in 2015 — targets that the Trudeau Liberals, when in opposition, used to dismiss as grossly inadequate.

All of this is background to the political story being played out in Alberta and British Columbia. Alberta’s NDP Premier Rachel Notley needs the Trans Mountain pipeline built if she is to have a chance of winning the next election. B.C. Premier John Horgan needs the pipeline scuppered if his Green-supported, minority NDP government is to survive.

To add to the complications, much of the opposition to the project comes not from critics who object to the pipeline itself but from those who worry that the increased tanker traffic resulting from the pipeline might foul B.C.’s pristine coastline.

As well, Horgan’s attempts to lure liquefied natural gas plants to B.C. cast some doubt on his commitment to reducing carbon emissions.

In the background, Kinder Morgan is becoming increasingly nervous about the future of its pipeline project, while the federal government tries desperately to figure out what it can do to solve the mess.

If this dispute is to be handled by law alone, then pipeline proponents have the edge. The Constitution seems clear that Ottawa has the ultimate authority over interprovincial undertakings.

It also has the constitutional authority to declare its unilateral jurisdiction over any project that it deems to be in the national interest. It has used this power at least 470 times since Confederation.

But anti-pipeline protestors have already shown they are willing to face arrest to make their point. If this becomes a showdown over the future of the planet, law may not be enough.

https://www.thestar.com/opinion/star-columnists/2018/04/10/pipeline-poli...

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Quote:
Legally and logically the Trans Mountain pipeline should be built — unless its contribution to global warming is destroying the Earth.

Is it a special case?  Or else why pump, refine, sell, buy or use ANY fossil fuels?

If you're already typing "YES!!!" then just think about it. 

If we all have to rely on geothermal energy, across Canada, then next winter we'll give a whole new, literal, meaning to "freeze in the dark".

"Oh, but wait, Mr. Magoo... you forgot tidal!"

NorthReport

Unfortunately we have a moron for a prime minister. Just some rich kid playing politics with other people's lives. 

Trudeau is in a pipeline box of his own making

A policy in which the environment and the economy walk hand-in-hand sounded good on paper, but has fallen apart on the ground over the Trans Mountain pipeline, Tim Harper writes.

https://www.thestar.com/opinion/star-columnists/2018/04/10/trudeau-is-in...

progressive17 progressive17's picture

What used to be affordable private housing were the many apartment buildings which went up in the 1960s and 1970s. They did not magically appear out of the hearts of investors. The government had a tax break called MURB (or multiple unit residential building). It was abolished in the early 1980s.

An apartment building developer will tell you it is much easier to presell condos than it is to get financing for an apartment building.

So, social housing is the best, owned by co-ops of its tenants, who charge each other enough rent for maintenance and property taxes. I like social housing, not because I will probably ever get any, but as it will increase supply, it should keep prices low in the private market.

Still, maybe we should also encourage the building of affordable private housing through a MURB-type tax break. Maybe we could let them expense some of their investment. This would also tend to increase supply.

NorthReport

Trudeau made a Faustian bargain

 

Re: “Trudeau faces a tough balancing act,” column, April 6.

Jack Knox is right about the prime minister’s political miscalculation. Faustian bargains seldom work out well.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau hoped to trade Kinder Morgan for a carbon tax and votes in Alberta. Instead, it is difficult to envisage any Liberal MPs from Alberta, and easy to see many of them lost in B.C. He has also sacrificed his honour, breaking clear campaign commitments, along with his environmental image.

Alberta Premier Rachel Notley’s part of the bargain would have been to kick off yet another boom-and-bust cycle without having to diversify their economy, in hope of being re-elected. It seems more likely that she will be replaced by someone with an even harder line.

There is now no chance of meeting even minimal climate-change targets for Canada in this prime minister’s term.

Another loss that gets less attention is his claim of a new relationship with Indigenous Peoples, who are in the courts to prevent his pushing a pipeline across their lands without permission. If he does succeed in forcing the pipeline and greatly increased traffic through these straits with only plans and promises for safety and recovery, then the first spill on our coast should bear his name.

Instead of meeting with and listening to us in B.C., he offers his well-worn but never implemented slogan that: “We don’t have to choose between the environment and the economy.” It turns out he means that he chooses political advantage instead.

http://www.timescolonist.com/opinion/letters/trudeau-made-a-faustian-bar...

NorthReport

Trudeau used to thrive on his international reputation. Now, not so much!

A Texas Oil Giant Wants Justin Trudeau to Help It Build a Controversial Pipeline Through Canada

But the government of British Columbia doesn’t want it to happen.

 

https://www.motherjones.com/politics/2018/04/a-texas-oil-giant-wants-jus...

NorthReport

Trudeau used to thrive on his international reputation. Now, not so much!

A Texas Oil Giant Wants Justin Trudeau to Help It Build a Controversial Pipeline Through Canada

But the government of British Columbia doesn’t want it to happen.

 

https://www.motherjones.com/politics/2018/04/a-texas-oil-giant-wants-jus...

NorthReport
NorthReport

Trudeau criticized for ‘personal’ day in midst of Kinder Morgan crisis

https://ipolitics.ca/2018/04/11/trudeau-criticized-for-personal-day-in-m...

NorthReport

Feds criticized for 'running away' from questions on Kinder Morgan pipeline plan

https://www.ctvnews.ca/politics/feds-criticized-for-running-away-from-qu...

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Trudeau’s upcoming trip ‘troubling’ given Kinder Morgan dispute: Singh

https://ipolitics.ca/2018/04/11/trudeaus-upcoming-trip-troubling-given-k...

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dp

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Who is looking afraid here?

Trans Mountain pipeline talks to be held behind closed doors

https://ipolitics.ca/2018/04/11/878145/

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This is no way to treat your employees!

Unions step up pressure for damages as polls show ‘stress and anguish’ of Phoenix crisis

https://ipolitics.ca/2018/04/11/unions-step-up-pressure-for-damages-as-p...

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Quote:
Trudeau’s upcoming trip ‘troubling’ given Kinder Morgan dispute: Singh

I think Singh is punching below his weight here.  The PM should not attend the Summit of the Americas because:

Quote:
He leaves behind a country wracked with division as the Kinder Morgan pipeline dispute boils over.

Ya.  Totally wracked.  A wrack up from the frack up.  Look out your window and tell me it doesn't look like outtakes from Mad Max.  Roving, lawless gangs stealing diesel fuel and getting mohawks and everything.

Geez Louise.  This isn't the kind of national crisis that requires a fireside chat and a steady hand on the tiller.  The courts will decide the legal stuff while the legislative branch watches from the peanut gallery.

NorthReport

Trudeau 'Squarely' To Blame As Kinder Morgan Halts Pipeline

The prime minister has long maintained the pipeline will be built.

https://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2018/04/09/andrew-scheer-trudeau-kinder-mo...

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Conservative MPs Unhappy With Some Of Maxime Bernier's Claims In Upcoming Book

The Quebec MP shared a sneak preview of his upcoming book.

https://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2018/04/11/conservative-mps-unhappy-with-s...

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Why should Andrew Scheer place any blame on B.C. or the B.C. government if he's not running against them in an election?  If he was the B.C. Conservative leader, it'd be Horgan, Horgan and more Horgan.

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Let's kick out Liberal MP Pamela Goldsmith-Jones, who is prepared to jeopardize BC's Coast, at the next federal election.

As Trudeau’s talks with Horgan and Notley draw near, local MP discusses Kinder Morgan

 

http://www.squamishchief.com/news/local-news/as-trudeau-s-talks-with-hor...

NorthReport

What a useless article and approach as it is just another ad for the fossil fuel industry!

How can Justin Trudeau solve his pipeline problem? Here are his options

The showdown over Kinder Morgan poses a crucial test of Trudeau’s national leadership, whether he can fulfil his promise to expand economic growth while balancing the concerns of Indigenous and environmental opponents. So just what’s on the table?

https://www.thestar.com/news/canada/analysis/2018/04/13/how-can-justin-t...

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