Le Ziploc

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Caissa
Le Ziploc

"I was putting the sandwich inside the Ziploc bag and he said, 'Mom! You can't use a Ziploc bag in my lunch!,' " she told CBC News.

Theoret learned that there was a draw for a teddy bear at her son's kindergarten class, but that if you had a plastic bag in your lunch you weren't eligible.

"The goal was around environment," she said. "However, my boy is six years old so he doesn't understand, or he didn't remember that it was around environment. All he understands is that if he doesn't have a Ziploc bag he won't get the [teddy bear]."

Theoret believes it was a harsh way for their six-year-old to learn about protecting the environment.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/canada/montreal/story/2011/02/02/laval-quebec-ziploc-sandwich-bag.html#ixzz1CpPPcUQI

Snert Snert's picture

They need a snitch line.  Also, some purity tests for those teachers wouldn't hurt either.  Not much sense having environmental contents arranged by teachers who drive to work or own dishwashers or use anything disposable.  Irony is not a renewable resource, folks!

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

Teachers are the problem!!  

Frown Yell

Unionist

Caissa wrote:
"All he understands is that if he doesn't have a Ziploc bag he won't get the [teddy bear]."

She meant the opposite - that "All he understands is that if he has a Ziploc bag he won't get the [teddy bear]."

I note that it has been corrected online now.

So the MSM editors and/or parents are the real problem.

And don't get me started on teddy bears.

 

ElizaQ ElizaQ's picture

 

  Ziploc bags can be reused just like a plastic container can.

Unionist

ElizaQ wrote:

 

  Ziploc bags can be reused just like a plastic container can.

No kidding. What is the Laval school board on about? We reuse Ziploc bags to the point of the ridiculous in our home. A plastic container makes more sense. But surely they should be teaching the kids not to throw out the Ziploc bags. Denial of teddy bears is destructive of the human environment.

I suggest they ease up on Ziploc bags and get the kids to harangue their parents about using cars, cigarettes, etc.

 

milo204

the only thing i could disagree with here is that they have obviously not contacted parents on this, so it's not fair to the kids.  I don't think it's fair to the kids to say just cause your mom doesn't use tupperware you don't get to win a teddy bear.  perhaps if the contest related to the kids behavior like recycling or shutting the lights out when you leave a room or something, rather than their parents...

on the other hand, there are plenty of contests in schools to bribe kids into acting certain ways that no one is complaining about.  I went to a french school and they would give you "points" for speaking french in the hallways (which no one did).  However it was at the teachers discretion so if they heard you sometimes they'd give you the "points" or maybe not, it was totally flawed and full of favoritism for the students they liked.  There's benefits/gifts/prizes for attending after school activities, pizza parties as rewards for certain tasks, etc, etc, etc.

I can't help but feel this has nothing to do with fairness, and everything to do with people crapping their pants about this because it relates to environmental issues.

 

Searosia

What Snert, are you really saying only the environmentally 'pure' are allowed to try to initiate environmental initiative?  Full o shit there :P

Theoret is right...its a silly teaching method when the students don't know the goal of what they're being taught

Unionist

milo204 wrote:

I can't help but feel this has nothing to do with fairness, and everything to do with people crapping their pants about this because it relates to environmental issues.

Ziploc bags can help with that too.

 

alan smithee alan smithee's picture

Why didn't the school just implement a ban on plastic bags?

It's not a huge stretch...When I was in elementary school,Quik and ball point pens were banned..We also couldn't wear denim.

Teaching kids about the environment would be far more ethical than bribing 6 year-olds.

Snert Snert's picture

Quote:
What Snert, are you really saying only the environmentally 'pure' are allowed to try to initiate environmental initiative?

Well, when only the environmentally 'pure' six year olds are eligible to win the contest they initiated, it doesn't seem so unreasonable to me. I guess I never did so well with "do as I SAY, not as I DO".

 

 

ElizaQ ElizaQ's picture

Unionist wrote:

ElizaQ wrote:

 

  Ziploc bags can be reused just like a plastic container can.

No kidding. What is the Laval school board on about? We reuse Ziploc bags to the point of the ridiculous in our home. A plastic container makes more sense. But surely they should be teaching the kids not to throw out the Ziploc bags. Denial of teddy bears is destructive of the human environment.

 

 

 

 If something like this had happened when I was in school my Dad would have had a fit and given them mouthful about real recycling.    I didn't get my sandwiches and other lunchables in ziploc bags but used milk bags.  Those things last forever.  I think my Dad saved and washed every single one that ever came into the house.   He even had a drying stand he made specifically for them.

Unionist

Drying Ziploc bags is quite the challenge. We have no system. If it's overnight, we'll just drape some over the faucets, and stand some up in the dish rack. Can you sketch your Dad's drying stand?

I can't believe that school boards are undermining Ziploc bags under my nose (Laval). Ziploc bags are one of the greatest inventions of the last century. We use them for everything.

ElizaQ ElizaQ's picture

Unionist wrote:

Drying Ziploc bags is quite the challenge. We have no system. If it's overnight, we'll just drape some over the faucets, and stand some up in the dish rack. Can you sketch your Dad's drying stand?

I can't believe that school boards are undermining Ziploc bags under my nose (Laval). Ziploc bags are one of the greatest inventions of the last century. We use them for everything.

 

 It's easy.  It's just a long skinny block with some round dowls stuck in it.  I think he might have drilled out the holes but I would think you could just screw them in from the bottom.    I think it had three or four of them.   The bags just slipped over the dowels and hung open so they drip dried.

Ripple

ElizaQ wrote:

I didn't get my sandwiches and other lunchables in ziploc bags but used milk bags.  Those things last forever.  I think my Dad saved and washed every single one that ever came into the house.   He even had a drying stand he made specifically for them.

Oh, ElizaQ, I thought I was the only one!  My mom did that and she had some contraption she built to dry them, too.  I'll have to ask her about it (she probably still has it).  And no tupperware - margarine and yogurt containers.  I hated it at the time - can't I just have my lunch in a brown paper bag like all the other kids?  Why do I have to use a thermos?

And she made pot scrubbers out of onion bags, but I guess that's another thread.

Unionist

Ripple wrote:

And she made pot scrubbers out of onion bags, but I guess that's another thread.

Yes, it is:

http://www.rabble.ca/babble/babble-banter/kitchen-sinks-and-dishwashers-...

 

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

I too hung bags for years and then I tried the containers.  I am sure that I use less plastic now than when I washed and hung and reused. Also the poor corporations will not suffer because they make both types of disposable plastic.  Now the only bags I wash and hang are the ones on their way to the soft plastic collection.

George Victor

It's all a retreat from the days (early 1990s) when the idea was advanced of a "naked lunch." absoluely free of plastic.

But, of course, schools (not the teachers)  frowned on use of the word (lunch).

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

I never thought of re-using ziploc bags - probably because I'm a huge sticker for a germ-free environment. I can't imagine ever re-using a plastic bag of any kind after using it for meat, for example. I've had severe food poisoning, and it sure ain't no picnic.

Unionist

Boom Boom wrote:

I never thought of re-using ziploc bags - probably because I'm a huge sticker for a germ-free environment. I can't imagine ever re-using a plastic bag of any kind after using it for meat, for example. I've had severe food poisoning, and it sure ain't no picnic.

Countertops and cutting boards worry me more - we don't tend to wash them as thoroughly.

 

M. Spector M. Spector's picture

ElizaQ wrote:

It's easy.  It's just a long skinny block with some round dowls stuck in it.  I think he might have drilled out the holes but I would think you could just screw them in from the bottom.    I think it had three or four of them.   The bags just slipped over the dowels and hung open so they drip dried.

I've got one of those. It looks like this:

[IMG]http://i56.tinypic.com/20po3k1.gif[/IMG]

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

I do. With cutting boards, I pour boiling water over them in the sink. I use a clean dishrag to clean counter tops - but food never touches the countertops here - just the cutting boards, dishes, or cookware. I run a tight ship.

The only small plastic bags I have ever re-used are the ones that bread comes in - and I just re-use them one time, then throw them out.

Unionist

Escher babbles - who knew?

 

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

ps: I personally would never re-use Ziploc bags for food items, but they are handy for items like nails, pennies, spark plugs, etc....

Snert Snert's picture

Quote:

I've got one of those. It looks like this:

 

What are the stairs like at your house?

Lard Tunderin Jeezus Lard Tunderin Jeezus's picture

Having thrown out bags of stuffed animals as my daughters out-grew them, most of which had never had more than a day's interest paid to them, I would suggest that the real problem is being ignored completely here.

(Actually, the mint condition ones went to Goodwill, but my point stands.)

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

Unionist wrote:

Escher babbles - who knew?

 

Given that often arguments here follow a very hard to define circle I am surprised you're surprised.  

I think there are many twisted posters here who can make a mobius strip out of an argument.  You know give it a twist in the middle and then tie the ends together so that you can't tell which side of the strip you are on.

6079_Smith_W

When our plastic bags come out of the wash water I just stick them up on the cupboard door over the sink. The water holds them there and they stay hanging even long after they are dry. When I pull them down they are generally dry inside and out. 

It works in the prairies, anyway. Not sure if it would be quite the same in the swamps of Ontario, Quebec and B.C.

(edit)

*just imagining sending a pickle or a sliced orange in a paper bag* 

Snert Snert's picture

Quote:
You know give it a twist in the middle and then tie the ends together so that you can't tell which side of the strip you are on.

 

You're always on THE side. A mobius strip only has one side!

 

I feel like there's more analogy to be mined here.

Slumberjack

Schools have to be vigilant nowadays when it comes to the sort of things kids like to pack into their ziploc bags.

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

Yes it only has one side but it is also both sides.  

Slumberjack I think that has been a major use of Ziplocs for more than a generation.  Parents have to be careful they don't just shake out the last of the loose pot and reuse it for a sandwich. That is generally frowned upon by school authorities when they find out.

Slumberjack

kropotkin1951 wrote:
Slumberjack I think that has been a major use of Ziplocs for more than a generation. 

I really am living in the boonies then, what with tinfoil pouches still in wide use.

milo204

oooo, can't stand the foil.  stuff always falls out, can't put it down open on anything for fear of spilling it, dries it out way faster.