France

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voice of the damned

(In response to the discussion at the end of the last page...)

Given France's run-off style of presidential elections, a candidate with very little support CAN make it into the final  tournament, if the rest of the stars align just right in the first. See 2002 for the most notable case.

But there is no way I would bet money on Melenchon winning the second round, even if he manages to get in.

Sean in Ottawa

voice of the damned wrote:

(In response to the discussion at the end of the last page...)

Given France's run-off style of presidential elections, a candidate with very little support CAN make it into the final  tournament, if the rest of the stars align just right in the first. See 2002 for the most notable case.

But there is no way I would bet money on Melenchon winning the second round, even if he manages to get in.

Melenchon's chances run about like this -- to get in the second round there needs to be a near tie with two centrist(ish) candidates, Le Pen and Melenchon with Melenchon and Le Pen slightly edging the centrists. Then with a straight up choice between Le Pen and Melenchon, centrist votes may choose to go to Melenchon rather than Le Pen.

Easy to imagine one of the two going in but both? This would require a strong anti-Europe vote. My guess is due to the pro and anti EU axis in voting, Melenchon would rise partly at the cost of Le Pen or visa versa. This means that very likely the final vote will be the centrist pro-Europe against either one of Melenchon or Le Pen. Very doubtful that Melenchon can get a run-off against Le Pen.

The sliver of possibility would be if two centrist candidates remain strong through the first vote -- so that you get Le Pen coming first, Melenchon second, centre/centre right/centre left third, and another centre right/centre left/centre fourth -- all very close. In this scenario you could then have the centre vote have to choose between Melenchon and Le Pen and there is a reasonable chance that they might choose Melenchon. This is very unlikely but not impossible. It would require Melenchon to get about 25% of the vote and have the rest distributed near perfectly. Say LePen 27, Melanchon 25, Centrist 24, Centrist 22, and a couple points to minor candidates.

The reason it is unlikely is that voters seeing the polls will likely move toward the stronger centrist pro EU canddiate to keep one on last ballot. It would take a deadlock so tight that the voters would be unable to make a strategic choice. It would also take Melenchon to get about a quarter of the vote with Le Pen a little more...

iyraste1313

However, the developments in France are now taking us to another level, because of twofactors of fundamental significance. The French people, having spent a number of decades hoping in vain for some improvement through the processes of elections and referenda, has now moved to the phase of direct, dynamic and mass mobilisation of the people. Secondly, the French movement is for the first time directly questioning the political and, indirectly but clearly, the social regime....from globalresearch...revolution returns to Europe...

yes this focus on and hopes with Melenchon...do miss the point...that the present ongoing crisis and collapse of the global capitalist system will not be served by electing some greater reformer type either right or left........

The focus must now be on how to twin the demands for citizen control, with citizen management of the economy and finances, what form will this take!

bekayne

voice of the damned wrote:

For those of you who might have thought that May 68 was a spontaneous outpouring of youthful idealism against an authoritarian sociopolitcal order, apparaently it was actually a "coup" that overthrew all-around good-guy General De Gaulle. At least according to Sputnik News and globalresearch.ca....

Is this the reverse of the 1968 Color Revolution (the French May) that led to a coup that forced President Charles de Gaulle to resign leaving the Elysee to the “former” Rothschild’s employee (just like Macron) Pompidou?

Is this the reverse of the French Revolution? Is this the real French Revolution?

The context is Sputnik suggesting that the the former Chief Of General Staff General De Villiers should somehow take power away from Macron in the event of the current situation evolving into an "emergency". They even call their desired scenario "the reverse of the French Revolution", just so we're all clear about where they stand ideologically.

https://tinyurl.com/y9746ez7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And the reason this great hero of the left De Villiers quit? Because Macron wouldn't increase the military spending enough.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pierre_de_Villiers#Disagreement_with_Macro...

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

Communism is dead in Europe however there is a real possibility that a mass movement dedicated to what might be termed eco-socialism may arise in the face of climate chaos. It seems that France has change driven from below hard wired into its national DNA.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Yellow Vest Women March Throughout France Against Austerity

Women "yellow jackets" all across France are mobilizing on Sunday to present the peaceful parts of the movement to the media that only reports violent events, they say.

Over 50,000 women gathered in front of the Place de la Bastille and in the Place de la République, in Paris, and others came together in Caen, Montceau-les-Mines, and Toulouse to demonstrate against President Emmanuel Macron’s austerity measures, including an increase in gas prices that the president eventually backed down after months of previous street demonstrations.

Organizers in Paris told the media: "Through this first women-only protest we wanted to have another channel of communication other than violence. All the media ever reports is the violence, and we are forgetting the root of the problem” which is the fight against austerity, said one protester, Karen, a 42-year-old nurse from Marseille told France 24.

Women in Toulouse marched with a large banner demanding Macron’s resignation. "Macron, If you do not come, we will come for you", read some of the protest banners. “Macron your goose is cooked, the chicks are in the street,” read other signs.....

iyraste1313

 

French Yellow Vest Protesters Urge Supporters To Spark Bank Run With Mass Withdrawals  by Tyler Durden

Fri, 01/11/2019 - 02:45

NDPP

Sounds interesting. But no url?

iyraste1313

 Tyler Durden...zerohedge.com amongst others I´ve seen

voice of the damned

I didn't find the link advocating a run on the banks. Did find this one, though...

https://tinyurl.com/ybjk7pjs

Guess it's not entirely unexpected that "Deliberate bank runs are sound economic policy" and "Build that wall!!" would somehow go together.

 

 

 

 

NDPP

The Noose Tightens Around the EU's Neck

https://www.strategic-culture.org/news/2018/12/12/noose-tightens-around-...

"And Macron's response may be exactly the thing needed to destroy what is left of Imperial Europe's credibility. Does Brussels even care? Every action they take to try and hold this dysfunctional and tyrannical union together is only tightening the noose around their necks and hastening their eventual demise..."

bekayne

NDPP wrote:

The Noose Tightens Around the EU's Neck

https://www.strategic-culture.org/news/2018/12/12/noose-tightens-around-...

"And Macron's response may be exactly the thing needed to destroy what is left of Imperial Europe's credibility. Does Brussels even care? Every action they take to try and hold this dysfunctional and tyrannical union together is only tightening the noose around their necks and hastening their eventual demise..."

https://seekingalpha.com/author/tom-luongo#regular_articles

I am a former research chemist by trade and an Austrian Economist by study and a market analyst by choice. For the past four years I have been a Senior Financial Editor with Newsmax Media publishing my thoughts on where markets, central banks, gold and geopolitics meet and explode.

NDPP

Notice how Bekayne never does this in the case of the reactionary propaganda he and his ilk post from the Guardian, WaPo or NYT?

bekayne

NDPP wrote:

Notice how Bekayne never does this in the case of the reactionary propaganda he and his ilk post from the Guardian, WaPo or NYT?

I take requests.

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

I think the idea is that that's for YOU to do.

Notice how political parties are always criticizing OTHER political parties' statements, but never their own?

NDPP

"The #GiletsJaunes protests today were larger than ever..."

https://twitter.com/YourMarkLubbers/status/1084148244601556995

NDPP

"OK, This will be my thread of the police brutality in France of the #GiletsJaunes protests since November the 17th. This will take me a long time but I don't care. I am going to expose the police brutality going on in France..."

https://twitter.com/sotiridi/status/1085129853509271552

bekayne

https://blogs.spectator.co.uk/2019/01/the-yellow-vests-are-at-the-vangua...

I'd like to see a debate between those on the left trying to appropriate the Gilets Jaunes and those on the right trying to appropriate the Gilets Jaunes. But it'll probably never happen. Neither side would want to admit that "their" movement isn't as large as they claim.

eastnoireast

ian welsh, as usual, is well worth a read.

http://www.ianwelsh.net/two-lessons-from-frances-yellow-vest-protests/

What I want to discuss, however, is WHY they are having some success where unions, for example, could not stop Macron.

No Centralized Control

The great weakness of modern unions is leadership, bank accounts and law.  They are easy to break if the state cooperates with corporations, or by the state alone. You can bribe the leadership, you can scare the leadership, or you can break the union.

Because unions have things like headquarters, leaders and bank accounts the state can simply take all of those things away any time it wants to if the unions don’t have enough internal support in the government to stop them.

This matters because unions tend to have centralized leadership: take out the leadership, get rid of the strike funds, and they can be broken.

The Yellow Vests have none of this. What tiny leadership they have is some facebook pages. They have no united bank account, no buildings, no strike funds, etc… They cannot be broken by a strike on a few people and some pooled resources.

Instead the yellow vests are just whoever wants to show up for any given protest and put on a yellow vest. This causes some problems, yes, but it means that they cannot easily be taken out.

-

NDPP

Most interesting. Thanks for posting.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

France 2019: Macron, Yellow Vests and class struggle

As the Yellow Vest movement in France continues its novel and inspiring revolt, Emmanuel Macron could not help expressing his class disdain for ordinary people: at a gala speech on the 11 January, he declared “Too many French people don’t know the meaning of the word ‘effort’. That’s part of the explanation for the present troubles”. This article takes a look at the general significance of Macron and the movement within class struggle in France.

Certainly, on our side, effort has not been lacking! It is unheard of to hold demonstrations in dozens of towns across the country on the weekend between Christmas and the New Year, but the Yellow Vest movement managed this, and succeeded, on 12 January, with one of the biggest waves of protests yet.

Imaginative and symbolic direct action has inspired all those who want smug-faced Macron thrown out of his palace. Motorways and ferry ports – and a horse racecourse - have been blockaded again, as well as some regional police headquarters and town halls, and one of Macron’s MPs woke up one morning to find their house entrance bricked up.

Early January, one minister was made to scurry out the back door of his ministry, as demonstrators smashed in his front door with a handy forklift truck. He later squealed something about “extreme violence threatening the Republic”.

Meanwhile, the 24-hour lies and distortions of much of the media have been challenged by demonstrations in front of TV headquarters, and blockades stopped delivery of at least three regional newspapers this week, including Ouest France. A right-wing news channel, BFM, refused to cover some demonstrations due to barracking by unhappy Yellow Vests. At the same time, Google and Amazon have been targeted by “Pay your taxes!” pickets.....

Sean in Ottawa

The yellow vest movement could have gone international but was defeated in the international arena.

In France it is a movement largely from the left. In other countries it is being dominated by right and far right forces.

https://www.thedailybeast.com/the-far-right-is-trying-to-co-opt-the-yell...

It is very possible that this is not a misunderstanding of the movement from those on the right but a purposeful re-definition in order to break the momementum from going international.

NorthReport
NDPP

Videos coming out of France of people withdrawing their money from the big banks! (and vid)

https://twitter.com/UnityNewsNet/status/1088563285530734592

"A massive French bank run is underway and the mainstream media is nowhere to be seen."

NDPP

'Puppet of Big Banks' (and vid)

https://on.rt.com/9n32

"French hit back at Macron's 'I'm one of you' overture..."

 

Vive La France!

https://twitter.com/hashtag/giletsjaunes?lang=en

 

Yellow Vest Protests Hit Paris for 11th Week in a Row (LIVE!)

https://www.rt.com/on-air/449817-yellow-vest-paris-protest/

 

bekayne
iyraste1313

The Gilet Jaune and ‘France Profonde’

The fight for democracy in the deep countryside

David Studdert

...the face of a new politics, based on local concrete demands...something to watch for everywhere....

how will this be translated into the political economic world...this is the question....

iyraste1313

Macron is a skinny little-trained seal in a circus where we cannot even see the ringmaster. Trump dances in his clown suit, the Brit leadership hop aboard a Brexit bicycle meant to distract, and Europe’s dancing big top whores do the “can-can” dance to the surrounding audience – the rest of us. We’re mesmerized by it all, by the show of shapely legs and firey rings tossed in the air. But the reality is blood for money, and the Yellow Vests’ boos are muffled by the wild cheers of New Yorkers or Londoners bored fleckless by austere existence. For me, I would like to know the deals underneath, not to prevent them necessarily, but just to hear what and how these men justify the unjustifiable. Cyprus’ Nicos Anastasiades and Macron? The lever the globalists are applying on Egypt? What role are those silent Israeli psychopaths playing in all this? Even experts can only surmise. But what we do know for certain, is that none of these people have the slightest concern for you, me, or the rest of humanity.

And that, my friends, is the “I told you so” you should have harkened to when Marine Le Pen got run out of the show.
https://journal-neo.org/2019/01/31/dear-france-i-told-you-le-pen-really-mattered/

voice of the damned

What role are those silent Israeli psychopaths playing in all this?

Probably not much, insofar as none of the issues enumerated elsewhere in the paragraph has anything to do with Israel, Palestine, the middle east, or even foreign-policy generally.  

EDIT: Well, he does mention Egypt. Not sure how that connects to the yellow vests or Franco-German relations, though.

 

 

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Gilets Jaunes “Assembly of Assemblies” calls for massive strike

We, Gilets Jaunes of the roundabouts, parking lots, squares, assemblies and demonstrations, gathered on January 26 and 27 for an “Assembly of Assemblies”, which united members of over a hundred Gilets Jaunes delegations from across France, all answering the call of the Gilets Jaunes of Commercy.

Since November 17, 2018, from the smallest villages deep in the country side to the biggest cities of France, we rose up against this deeply violent, unjust and unbearable society. We shall no longer be treated that way! We revolt against the cost of life, poverty, instability and misery. We wish for our relatives, friends, families and children, that they all will be able to live in dignity. Currently, 26 billionaires possess as much as half of the world population — this is totally unacceptable.

Let’s share wealth and not misery! Down with the social inequalities! We demand the immediate increase of wages, of the social allowances, of the subsidies and pensions; we demand the unconditional right for lodging, health, education and free public services for all! It is for all these rights that we occupy the roundabouts across the country on a daily basis, that we organize direct actions, demonstrations and arrange public debates. With our yellow vests, we are reclaiming the power to speak, we who never had it before.

quote:

We are as strong as the diversity of our debates. At this very moment, hundreds of assemblies are elaborating and proposing their own demands. These assemblies talk about real democracy, social justice, tax issues, working conditions, ecological justice and the end of discrimination. Among the most debated claims and strategical proposals we find: the end of misery in all its forms, the transformation of the institutions (with projects like the Citizen Initiated Referendum, constituent assembly, the end of the privileges of the elected representatives), the ecological transition (energetic scarcity, industrial pollution), equality and the recognition of anyone no matter what nationality (handicapped people, gender issues, an end to the isolation of the populous suburbs, neighborhoods, rural areas and overseas territories).

We, Yellow Vests, are inviting anyone to join us with their own abilities and capacities. We call to pursue the actions with Act 12 against police violence in front of the police stations and the Acts 13, 14 etc… We call for the continuation of the occupation of the roundabouts and the blocking of the economy, to engage in a massive and unlimited strike starting on February 5, 2019.

We call for the creation of popular committees in the workplaces, in study places and everywhere else in order that this strike could led from the grassroots by the strikers themselves, and not by the unions. Let’s take the matter in our own hands! Don’t stay alone, join us!

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

France’s class wars

France’s elites have not felt such fear in half a century, and it’s not the usual fear of losing an election, failing to ‘reform’ or seeing their shares slide on the stock market, but fear of insurrection, revolt, and loss of power. The street protests on 1 December 2018 caused some to feel a sudden chill. As BFM TV’s star news anchor Ruth Elkrief shuddered: ‘The most urgent thing is for people to go home.’ The channel was showing footage of yellow vest protesters determined to claim a better life for themselves.

A few days later, a journalist from the pro-business daily L’Opinion revealed on TV that ‘all the big industrial groups are going to give out bonuses, because they were really scared for a time that their heads would end up on stakes. So after that terrible Saturday when all the damage was done [1 December], the big firms called Geoffroy Roux de Bézieux, the head of Medef [France’s largest employers’ federation], and told him to “drop everything! Drop it all, or else...” They felt physically threatened.’

On the same programme, the head of a polling organisation claimed top bosses were ‘actually very worried’ and said that the atmosphere reminded him of similar events in 1936 and 1968 that he had read about: ‘There comes a time when you say to yourself, “You have to be able to give away large sums to avoid losing what’s most important”’ (1). At the time of the Popular Front (1936-8), Benoît Frachon, head of the CGT (General Confederation of Labour), reported that during negotiations at Matignon, the French prime minister’s residence, bosses had ‘given in across the board’ after a bout of unofficial strikes and factory occupations.

Such a cave-in of the elite is rare, but it also brings a lesson from history: those who have felt fear do not forgive those who caused it or those who witnessed it (2). The yellow vest movement has provoked a reaction that has many precedents because it has proved enduring, hard to grasp, leaderless, speaks a language that institutions do not understand, and remains determined despite police repression and popular despite hostile media coverage of damage done on days of mass protest. In times when social groups crystallise and there is undisguised class struggle, everyone has to choose sides. The centre ground disappears. And even the most liberal, educated and distinguished people drop any pretence of peaceful coexistence. Fear robs them of their composure.

Alexis de Tocqueville was similarly affected when he wrote about the events of June 1848 in Paris in his memoirs. Soldiers sent in by the ruling bourgeoisie, who believed that ‘only the cannon can settle our century’s questions’, had massacred impoverished workers (3). Forgetting his good manners, Tocqueville described the socialist leader Auguste Blanqui as having ‘a dirty look, like a pallid, mouldy corpse. He looked as if he had lived in a sewer and only just come out. He reminded me of a snake having its tail pinched.’.....

 

bekayne

So he's now more popular than he was before the protests started. Same polling firm shows he would be re-elected 56-44 over Le Pen. 

NDPP

Protester Has Hand Ripped Off During Yellow Vest March in Paris (and vid)

https://on.rt.com/901b

"The right hand of one of the Yellow Vest protesters has been blown off by a police grenade, according to eyewitnesses..."

#GiletsJaunes

https://twitter.com/hashtag/giletsjaunes?lang=en

Tens of thousands of Yellow Vest protesters march across France today for the 13th week in a row.

voice of the damned

bekayne wrote:

So he's now more popular than he was before the protests started. Same polling firm shows he would be re-elected 56-44 over Le Pen. 

If Marine Le Pen is now the assumed default candidate against the "neo-liberals", that pretty much guarantees that En Marche or whoever succeeds them will win elections for the foreseeable futute.  

bekayne

voice of the damned wrote:

bekayne wrote:

So he's now more popular than he was before the protests started. Same polling firm shows he would be re-elected 56-44 over Le Pen. 

If Marine Le Pen is now the assumed default candidate against the "neo-liberals", that pretty much guarantees that En Marche or whoever succeeds them will win elections for the foreseeable futute.  

Melanchon polls even lower than Macron and Le Pen

NDPP

France Recalls Rome Ambassador Over 'Baseless Attacks'

https://news.sky.com/story/france-recalls-rome-ambassador-over-baseless-...

"...Earlier this week, Mr DiMaio met supporters of a yellow vest group thinking of running in the European elections in May. France's yellow vest movement has become the biggest challenge to Mr Macron's presidency, protesting against his economic reforms, which are seen as favouring the rich while squeezing the household incomes of ordinary people."

 

'Macron Unleashed Violence Against Yellow Vests, Each Casualty Is On Him' - French Author & Academic

https://on.rt.com/9o1l

"Emmanuel Macron has chosen not to maintain order, but to suppress public protests,' writes Michael Onfray in his blog, in an attempt at a definitive account of the protests that have gripped France. Onfray writes that the protests did not begin as a 'peasants' revolt of disgruntled right-wingers' refusing to pay an environmental fuel tax - as it is being portrayed by newspapers - but was simply a result of ordinary French saying 'We cannot pay!' Instead of listening however, Macron decided to escalate the conflict 'using it for his own benefit and the interests of the Maastricht Camp..."

'This is an order that is strong against the weak and weak against the strong. When the rich call the poor names, it is a variation of old themes, that the working classes are dangerous classes. This is the song all bourgeois establishments sing when they are scared,' writes Onfray.

The Imploding EU: Built for the Rich Not the Poor!

NDPP

French 'Yellow Vests' Hold 13th Protest Against Social Inequality, Police Brutality

https://www.wsws.org/en/articles/2019/02/11/fren-f11.html

"Well, at a certain point we'll need a revolution, there is no point deceiving ourselves..."

Unlike Canada where deceiving ourselves is always the preferred option.

iyraste1313

Unlike Canada where deceiving ourselves is always the preferred option.....

Be patient! As the forces of desperation overwhelm, and spring thaw releases the energy...be prepared!

voice of the damned

bekayne wrote:

voice of the damned wrote:

bekayne wrote:

So he's now more popular than he was before the protests started. Same polling firm shows he would be re-elected 56-44 over Le Pen. 

If Marine Le Pen is now the assumed default candidate against the "neo-liberals", that pretty much guarantees that En Marche or whoever succeeds them will win elections for the foreseeable futute.  

Melanchon polls even lower than Macron and Le Pen

I'm far from an expert on French politics, but my guess would be you're more likely to see the revival of either the Socialists or one of the Gaullist parties as an alternative to En Marche, rather than any continued rise in fortune for either the National Front or LFI.

bekayne

voice of the damned wrote:

bekayne wrote:

voice of the damned wrote:

bekayne wrote:

So he's now more popular than he was before the protests started. Same polling firm shows he would be re-elected 56-44 over Le Pen. 

If Marine Le Pen is now the assumed default candidate against the "neo-liberals", that pretty much guarantees that En Marche or whoever succeeds them will win elections for the foreseeable futute.  

Melanchon polls even lower than Macron and Le Pen

I'm far from an expert on French politics, but my guess would be you're more likely to see the revival of either the Socialists or one of the Gaullist parties as an alternative to En Marche, rather than any continued rise in fortune for either the National Front or LFI.

The same poll which had Macron and Le Pen in the high 20s for the 1st round had the Gaullist at 8% and the Socialist at 3%

NDPP

'I Worry About My Country'...

https://twitter.com/GUENGL/status/1095070928252354560

"On top of the heavy injury toll, there've been 1000s of preventative arrests, wiretaps, wrongful imprisonment - even the media and political opposition's been repressed. How is this normal?

'I worry about my country; I worry about freedom in France; and I worry about President Macron's authoritarian shift.'

WWWTT

Anybody here believe in karma? Vietnam Cambodia and Laos, among many others. 

Michael Moriarity Michael Moriarity's picture

WWWTT wrote:

Anybody here believe in karma? Vietnam Cambodia and Laos, among many others. 

For individuals, maybe. For countries, nope.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Gilets Jaunes and the security state

Paris every Saturday becomes a battleground. Riot cops cordon off large sections of the centre of the city with temporary fences and armoured vehicles resembling tanks. On the 15th January, I followed a few hundred people on a march which ended in several large groups of Gilets Jaunes bottlenecked into the streets feeding into a cross roads near the Elyseé palace. People were chanting peacefully, angrily certainly, but peacefully. They were making demands for democracy and redistribution of wealth and calling for the RIC (citizen’s referendum initiative) which aims to add a mechanism for direct democracy to the French constitution. You don’t have to think it’s a good idea to see that to demand it in public space is a legitimate form of democratic engagement. These demands were aimed at bringing power closer to the people and making society more equal. The state’s response was swift and indicative of the wider values of the capitalist class. As more people tried to join together to form bigger groups in the crossroads the first tear gas grenade pin was pulled.

quote:

The state has been very keen to try and repress these protests because the aims of the movement are anathema to Macron’s agenda of privatisations and deregulation. Macron is committed to shrinking the state. He has attempted to privatise the state run rail company the SNCF and teh national lottery. The Gilets Jaunes however favour much more state involvement, one of their most frequent demands has been for the nationalisation of the motorways, and a routinely circulated graphic of demands included a section on the complete halting of all privatisations. The state thought that if they could crush the protests quickly through use of force, the damage to tourism revenues would be minimal as central Paris would not have to be cordoned off each week and turned into a battleground. What we have seen here with the repression attempts is the scared reaction of capital when its power is challenged from below.

The security establishment is one of the areas of the French state best safeguarded from austerity. In the wake of the wave of terror attacks in 2015/16 the various departments of the French police and gendarmerie have received boosts in funding and extra powers that notionally help deal with terrorism. While the coercive arm of the state thrives, it was announced in 2017 that 120,000 public sector jobs would be axed, the first day of sick leave would go unpaid and swingeing cuts to housing, pensions and other social welfare payments are planned for 2019 in a doomed bid to eliminate the deficit. This isn’t anathema to the logic of austerity – it’s perfectly in keeping with a programme which ensures that wealth is funnelled directly into the pockets of the wealthy – and preventing those hit hardest by this system from having their say.

NDPP

Yellow Vest Protesters Demonstrating in Paris For 14th Week (LIVE)

https://www.rt.com/on-air/451615-yellow-vest-paris-protest/

 

Gilets Jaunes

https://twitter.com/hashtag/giletsjaunes?lang=en

"Still huge numbers protesting in Paris every week."

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Yellow Vests and Red Unions Strike Together

quote:

Moreover, the Yellow Vests, who have been a painful thorn in Macron’s side since last November, were now demonstrating together with the French labour unions, whom he thought he had tamed last Spring. This convergence came in response to a call for a one-day “General Strike” issued by the Confédération générale du travail (CGT) and Solidaires, who for the first time invited “any Yellow Vests who felt like it” to join. In the event, quite a few did feel like it, despite the CGT’s previous hostility to the Yellow Vests and despite their own fundamental suspicion of all “representative” structures, like established parties and unions (whom the Yellow Vests justifiably fear would attempt to co-opt them, speak in their name, and sell them out).

A Day of Action and Convergence

For a “first date” the one-day Strike came off very well, somewhat to the surprise of both parties. And if this tentative Red-Yellow alliance continues to solidify (and there is every indication that it will), France will likely become ungovernable and the ruling classes will be up against the wall. What might happen next is rich in possibility, for the French, with their long history of popular revolutions, have been singularly inventive in coming up with new political arrangements. For now, let us look more closely at what may, in retrospect, be an historic day.

The Strike began at exactly midnight when a rowdy crowd of 200-300 demonstrators near Paris blocked the giant Rungis produce market (which replaced Les Halles, the legendary “Belly of Paris”), cutting off food to the capital with trucks lining up on the outskirts. You can see the Yellow Vests among the Red flags of the CGT in this video from Le Parisien. They even set up a barricade. In the early hours, there were also blockages at the airport of Nantes and at the University there, at a key toll-gate near Toulouse, while in Grenoble transport was disturbed all morning.

All told there were demonstrations in at least 160 different localities, all different in size and conduct, mostly improvised by people on the spot at the last minute. There were big ones in the Channel ports Le Harvre, Rouen and Caen. In Strasbourg about 1500, in Lyon 5000 including 500 Yellow vests. In Marseille the Yellow Vest march converged with the CGT at the Stock Exchange, a shift of targets for the Yellow Vests from government to finance capital.

In Paris, instead of the usual union march through the popular quarters from the Bastille to Nation, the CGT-led strikers invaded the fancy Right Bank territory, violently contested for twelve weeks by the Yellow Vests, marching boldly up the Rue de Rivoli with its luxurious shop-windows (and construction sites with bricks lying around). They then held an impromptu rally at a major intersection, tying up traffic and baffling the police.1

All told there were demonstrations in at least 160 different localities, all different in size and conduct, mostly improvised by people on the spot at the last minute. There were big ones in the Channel ports Le Harvre, Rouen and Caen. In Strasbourg about 1500, in Lyon 5000 including 500 Yellow vests. In Marseille the Yellow Vest march converged with the CGT at the Stock Exchange, a shift of targets for the Yellow Vests from government to finance capital.

In Paris, instead of the usual union march through the popular quarters from the Bastille to Nation, the CGT-led strikers invaded the fancy Right Bank territory, violently contested for twelve weeks by the Yellow Vests, marching boldly up the Rue de Rivoli with its luxurious shop-windows (and construction sites with bricks lying around). They then held an impromptu rally at a major intersection, tying up traffic and baffling the police.1

Here in Montpellier, as elsewhere in France, the crowd was big, but no bigger than some of the previous Saturday Yellow Vest demos – as was the case all over France. But this Tuesday it was largely a union crowd. On the other hand, after weeks of gassing peaceful protestors, the police presence was extremely discrete, and one Gendarme was filmed explaining to the Yellow Vests protestors that the Gendarmes had “nothing against them,” that his family supported the movement, explaining that they were soldiers and sworn to obey orders (the Gendarmerie being under the military). The Yellow Vests answered that they “had nothing against the Gendarmes either.” See the amazing video.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

On peut-être un frigo vide musulman, juif, catholique, protestant, bouddhiste, agnostique, blanc, noir, jaune, beurre, homme, femme, homo, hétéro, jeune, moins jeune ... on reste un frigo vide !

..google translation:

Maybe an empty fridge Muslim, Jewish, Catholic, Protestant, Buddhist, agnostic, white, black, yellow, butter, man, woman, homo, hetero, young, less young ... we remain an empty fridge!

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

NDPP

Breaking - France will define 'anti-Zionism as a form of anti-Semitism,' Macron tells French Jewish groups.

https://twitter.com/BreakingF24/status/1098322160144113664

NDPP

Paris 'Anti-Capitalist' (and vid)

https://twitter.com/Gerrrty/status/1101840401122627584

"The atmosphere is festive at the head of procession, rue de Boulainvilliers..."

Good to see some people's issues last longer than the msm news cycle.

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