Honduras: I tawt I taw a coup d'état

102 posts / 0 new
Last post
M. Spector M. Spector's picture
Honduras: I tawt I taw a coup d'état
M. Spector M. Spector's picture

[url=http://www.democracynow.org/2009/7/9/in_rare_us_broadcast_ousted_hondura... Now's interview with ousted President Zelaya[/url]

M. Spector M. Spector's picture

Quote:
Honduran President Manuel Zelaya said on Wednesday that his presence in Costa Rica is not to respond to any negotiation and that what is appropriate is for the leaders of the de facto regime in his country to present excuses [apologies? - M.S.] and the requirements for their withdrawal from power "in the next 24 hours."

On arriving in San José for the announced mediation by Costa Rican President Oscar Arias on the Honduran situation, Zelaya explained to journalists that he is there to hear, through the mediator, what the coup leaders have to say and see how they are planning their withdrawal, "which is the most honourable for the Latin American democracies."

Zelaya said that he is acting in accordance with the OAS resolutions and the severe declarations which have condemned "this blow to democracy," and without recognizing the authorities that the usurpers are trying to name before different countries and international organizations.

[url=http://www.juventudrebelde.co.cu/international/2009-07-09/manuel-zelaya-... Rebelde[/url]

Michelle

BEST THREAD TITLE EVER!!!

Unionist

I thought Spector had mistakenly posted a tweet.

 

writer writer's picture

Michelle, I thought the same thing. Hats off, M.

Unionist

From the Democracy Now! interview above:

Zelaya wrote:
The Popular Consultation is a survey, just like the Gallup one does or other polling groups. It does not create rights. It has no power to impose. It is not obligatory, its an opinion poll. How could this be a motive for a coup d’etat?

Apparently the Supreme Court ruled that he couldn't do this. Apparently he defied the court. Apparently the military used this as a pretext for the coup. I wish Amy Goodman had asked Zelaya something like, "Given that this was just an opinion poll, was this defiance of the court order a massive miscalculation on your part? Why did you bother?"

Hugo Chavez was also overthrown by a U.S.-backed military coup. If memory serves, a massive popular uprising reinstated him before the weekend was out. Does Zelaya actually have any popular support - was that airport demonstration a flash in the pan, or is there more to come?

Sorry, I haven't read details about all this; perhaps the answers are there somewhere.

 

Lou Arab Lou Arab's picture

Michelle wrote:

BEST THREAD TITLE EVER!!!

I opened this thread just to say this.  Michelle beat me to it.

A_J

Unionist wrote:
From the Democracy Now! interview above:

Zelaya wrote:
The Popular Consultation is a survey, just like the Gallup one does or other polling groups. It does not create rights. It has no power to impose. It is not obligatory, its an opinion poll. How could this be a motive for a coup d’etat?

Apparently the Supreme Court ruled that he couldn't do this. Apparently he defied the court. Apparently the military used this as a pretext for the coup. I wish Amy Goodman had asked Zelaya something like, "Given that this was just an opinion poll, was this defiance of the court order a massive miscalculation on your part? Why did you bother?"

Hugo Chavez was also overthrown by a U.S.-backed military coup. If memory serves, a massive popular uprising reinstated him before the weekend was out. Does Zelaya actually have any popular support - was that airport demonstration a flash in the pan, or is there more to come?

Sorry, I haven't read details about all this; perhaps the answers are there somewhere.

Good questions.

If this was just a survey, no different than something Gallup would conduct, as he claims, why didn't he do the obvious and just commission a poll from Gallup or another polling firm, rather than breaking into a military base to steal the ballots to conduct his own?

There have been demonstrations both for and against the Zelaya since the large protest at the airport (where the young man was killed).

AFP - Protest as Honduras's rival camps dig in for talks (10/07/09)

VOA - Demonstrations, Counter Protests Expected in Honduras (07/07/09)

BBC - Honduras 'to stop Zelaya plane' (05/05/09)

Jingles

Quote:
rather than breaking into a military base to steal the ballots to conduct his own?

Don't bother questioning the fact that the military has control over the ballots. I guess having military control over the democratic process is actually democracy. Who knew?

NDPP

Zelaya and Micheletti leave delegations to continue mediations

http://narcosphere.narconews.com/notebook/kristin-bricker/2009/07/zelaya...

Micheletti Tried to Change the Constitution in 1985

http://narcosphere.narconews.com/notebook/kristin-bricker/2009/07/michel...

A_J

NoDifferencePartyPooper wrote:
Micheletti Tried to Change the Constitution in 1985

">http://narcosphere.narconews.com/notebook/kristin-bricker/2009/07/michel...

So?

In 1985 he was a member of congress, which is the proper body to propose changes to the consitution, not the presidency.

And the Honduran constitution has been amended virtually every year since it came into force in 1982 - it's not set in stone, it's just that only certain institutions (the legislature) are able to change it.

N.Beltov N.Beltov's picture

Some babblers seems determined to carry the line of imperialism, one way or another, on these threads. It's important, then, to reiterate the following in case other babblers are mislead by such garbage ...

It's not about Zelaya

Quote:
U.S. journalists generally present world events as the actions of a few important individuals, a sort of Greek drama without the chorus. Latin American politics especially are viewed as a parade of good guys and bad guys -- Fidel Castro, August Pinochet, Hugo Chávez, Alvaro Uribe. Which is good and which is bad depends on your perspective.

So what's going on?

Quote:
"What Zelaya has done has just been little reforms," Rafael Alegría, the leader of the local branch of the international group Vía Campesina ("Campesino Way"), explained to the Mexican daily La Jornada on June 29. "He isn't a socialist or a revolutionary, but these reforms, which didn't harm the oligarchy at all, have been enough for them to attack him furiously."

The local elite and the U.S. media insist that the nonbinding referendum Zelaya wanted to hold on June 28 was a power grab. In reality Hondurans would simply have been asked whether they wanted to vote in the November general elections on a constituent assembly to rewrite the 1982 Constitution. If this actually came about, the new Constitution might well allow presidential reelection, but it's not easy to see how any constituent assembly could finish its work in time to keep Zelaya in office after his term expires on January 27, 2010.

A more likely motive for the coup lies in the Honduran oligarchy's fear of what would happen if the people got a chance to write their own Constitution.

What about all the popular and mass movements?

Quote:
Not many people in the United States are aware that over the past few decades Hondurans have created, under very adverse circumstances, a vibrant grassroots movement: campesino organizations like Vía Campesina; three labor confederations, often competing, sometimes cooperating; a strong indigenous movement; Afro-Honduran groups like the Honduran Black Fraternal Organization (OFRANEH);human rights monitoring groups like the Committee of Relatives of Disappeared Detainees in Honduras (COFADEH); environmental groups; community radio stations; an anti-militarization movement; women's groups; student groups; and a nascent LGBT movement.

Early this year, Honduran teachers went on strike for back pay and held a sit-in at the education ministry. In February the Civic Council of Grassroots and Indigenous Organizations of Honduras (COPINH) organized a 12-day mobilization to protest the destruction of forests. In April hundreds of indigenous Chortí blocked access to the Copán archeological park, probably Honduras' most important ancient Mayan site, to press demands for land.

None of these were one-time protests -- they continued long-term struggles, some going back for years. And these same groups, which frequently support each other and coordinate their actions, are the ones that have confronted the coup and the subsequent repression with massive and spirited protests throughout the country.

And that's why organizations like the CLC expressed their solidarity the way they did. It's a question of where your social partisanships lie - with the super-rich, the military officers, and so on, or the ordinary people. Should the people be allowed to have a say? That is the question. Never mind the pro-fascist bullshit.

 

 

N.Beltov N.Beltov's picture

As of Thursday, we have the Yanqui sponsored "negotiations" between the military dictatorship and the overthrown elected President. It's a farce, compliments of Uncle Sam.

Quote:
Eva Golinger: So things are pretty much where they were 12 days ago. And in the meantime, 12 days have passed and the people of Honduras are living in a dictatorship!! And their constitutional president, who is trying to return back to his elected position, is getting the brush away from the White House, which seems to be controlling the situation at this point. The people of Honduras are still living in a militarized state, with a curfew imposed and a suspension of constitutional rights. They are also still resisting in the streets, despite the dangers and risks, to try and force the coup government to step down.

Both Zelaya and Micheletti have left "delegations" in Costa Rica to continue "negotiating". The whole thing is getting pretty circusy and not looking good in the short time.

 

It seems, as well, that the International Republican Institute (IRI), the international arm of reaction and violence of the Republican Party in the USA, was discussing a coup in Honduras MONTHS AGO. USA! USA! How many kids did you KILL today?!

 

N.Beltov N.Beltov's picture

Fidel Castro Ruz: the Coup Dies or Constitutions Die

Fidel Castro wrote:
Today Honduras is not just a country occupied by a coup, but it is also a country occupied by the armed forces of the United States.

The military base at Soto Cano, also known by its name of Palmerola - located less than 100 kilometres from Tegucigalpa and reactivated in 1981 under the Ronald Reagan administration - was used by Colonel Oliver North when he was running the dirty war against Nicaragua, and from there the US government directed the attacks against the Salvadoran and Guatemalan revolutionaries that cost tens of thousands of lives.

The old man always has something interesting to say and he also finds time to look to history to learn ...

Fidel Castro wrote:
If President Zelaya is not returned to his position, a wave of coups threatens to sweep away many Latin American governments, or these will be at the mercy of the ultra right-wing military, educated in the security doctrine of the School of the Americas, experts in torture, psychological warfare and terror. The authority of many civilian governments in Central and South America will become weakened. Those dark days are not very far back in time. The military perpetrators of the coup would not even pay any attention to the civilian administration of the United States. It can be very negative for a president who wants to improve that country's image, like Barack Obama does. The Pentagon formally obeys the civilian power. The legions have not yet taken over control of the empire as they did in Rome.

 

It may be noteworthy that the Tudeh Party of Iran is not too busy to express solidarity with the Honduran people and working class.

(.pdf file)

remind remind's picture

Thanks for all that nbeltov, interesting reads.

Fidel

[url=http://globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=14320]Honduras: US-backed mediation legitimizes military coup[/url]

 

Quote:

As the US-orchestrated “mediation” got under way in San José, Honduran workers and youth continued to resist the coup. Thousands of people demonstrated Thursday and Friday in Tegucigalpa, San Pedro Sula and many other cities. In a number of areas, protesters occupied highways and bridges, halting traffic. On Thursday, demonstrators blocked traffic for six hours on the main route connecting Tegucigalpa to the Pan American highway and Nicaragua and El Salvador to the south, leaving long lines of tractor trailers backed up into the capital. On Friday, thousands marched to northern Tegucigalpa to shut down the highway leading to San Pedro Sula, the country’s second largest city. The coup regime’s repression is also continuing. On Thursday, security forces detained the father of Isis Obed Murillo, the 19-year-old youth who was shot to death on July 5, when soldiers opened fire on demonstrators who had gathered at the Tegucigalpa airport as Zelaya made his abortive attempt to return to the country. The father, David Murillo, has spoken out since the killing, demanding justice for his son. He was grabbed by the national police after speaking at the headquarters of the Committee of Relatives of the Detained and Disappeared of Honduras and taken directly to a prison controlled by the military.

N.Beltov N.Beltov's picture

Last week, on Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday, the US congress received representatives of the de facto Honduran regime. The news reports from the US are still re-interating the disgusting and despicable lies of the military regime ...

UPI wrote:
WASHINGTON, July 12 (UPI) -- A key member of the U.S. Congress has tempered his support for ousted Honduran president Manuel Zelaya, analysts say.

After first calling for Zelaya's immediate reinstatement following his removal in what appeared to be a June 28 military coup, U.S. Rep. Eliot Engel, D-N.Y., chairman of the House Foreign Affairs' subcommittee on the Western Hemisphere, has stopped short of again making the demand, the Washington publication The Hill reported Sunday.

At a subcommittee hearing Friday, Engel voiced more support for the Honduran government, noting that before his removal, Zelaya had chosen to ignore his country's own Supreme Court and legislature and sought to change its Constitution by seeking a second term as president, The Hill reported.

'sought to change its Constitution by seeking a second term as president ..."

This is, of course, a barefaced lie.

Quote:
"When the entire political establishment speaks and expresses dire concerns, the president needed to listen," Engel said. "From everything I can see, he did not."

What's true is that the military objected to a non-binding referendum that involved the citizenry.

Quote:
U.S. President Barack Obama has called for the reinstatement of Zelaya, a leftist with ties to Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez, but is seeking a negotiated resolution, the publication said.

In other words, the Honduran President should "negotiate" with a military dictatorship while outside the country. Good job, President Obama. Way to talk out of one side of your mouth and watch events unfold in the opposite direction.

US House leaders do the usual Yanqui imperialist shuffle ...

 

 

 

boomerbsg

Am I the only one who is starting to feel that the shine is coming off the Obabma administration? Still in Iraq, more trops in Afghanistan and now this. I guess more things change the more they stay the same.

Fidel

boomerbsg wrote:

Am I the only one who is starting to feel that the shine is coming off the Obabma administration?

Theyre all the same cosmetic leader in Washington since a US national security act was signed in 1947. And successive colonial administrativeships in Ottawa simply follow orders from corporate America aka the United Semi-Socialist States of America.

boomerbsg

what act is that? never heard of it.

Fidel

boomerbsg wrote:

what act is that? never heard of it.

 

This is a decent intro to the subject: [url=http://www.thirdworldtraveler.com/New_World_Order/US_Nat_Secur_State_BNW... U.S. National Security State[/url]

excerpted from the book Brave New World Order (1992)

 

Fidel

[url=http://www.soaw.org/presente/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=2... Emergency Response Delegation Report[/url]

 

Quote:
My plane has just lifted off from the Toncontin airport in Tegucigalpa and I look down on the runway that five days ago was blocked by army tanks and soldiers, prohibiting the return of Honduran president Manuel Zelaya, ousted 12 days ago in a coup. Hundreds of thousands of people had swollen the roads leading to the airport to receive "Mel", as the president is affectionately known. One 19-year old who came from the interior of the country, Isis Obed Murillo, was shot in the head by soldiers trying to disperse the crowd, his brains literally blown apart.

N.Beltov N.Beltov's picture

The Russian media is regurgitating the same lies that UPI barfed up.

RIA Novosti wrote:
The Honduran military arrested President Manuel Zelaya on June 28, the day polls were due to open for a referendum on the extension of his non-renewable, four-year term of office, and flew him to Costa Rica.

(highlighted by me) To re-iterate: the President of Honduras had planned to hold a consultative non-binding referendum on the right of the citizenry to make future constitutional changes. Those changes did NOT include extending his own term of office. His term was scheduled to end in November but, with the coup d'etat, has effectively already ended.

Fidel

I dont think US or KKK'nadian newz media were as conciliatory about prior CIA and British efforts to destabilize the Balkans a dozen years ago, Chechnya etc.

N.Beltov N.Beltov's picture

Maybe not, but the bullshit is being spread far and wide and that, I think, is of interest to babblers and progressives alike.

thanks

1) this is awful, from #16 above:

"On Thursday, security forces detained the father of Isis Obed Murillo, the 19-year-old youth who was shot to death on July 5, when soldiers opened fire on demonstrators who had gathered at the Tegucigalpa airport as Zelaya made his abortive attempt to return to the country. The father, David Murillo, has spoken out since the killing, demanding justice for his son. He was grabbed by the national police after speaking at the headquarters of the Committee of Relatives of the Detained and Disappeared of Honduras and taken directly to a prison controlled by the military."

where is the father now? does Obama or anyone else in Congress, or our Parliament, give a damn?

2) on the comments at #6 etc. about the constituent 'poll', my understanding from the interview is that it was a short-form way of describing the initial referendum which, most importantly, would have decided upon a more extended process to set up a structure of resident participation in decision-making which, as noted at the earlier Honduras thread, may have involved a couple of years.

a good point from the Democracy Now interview linked at #1 that needs repeating:

"JUAN GONZALEZ: Mr. President, your opponents who engineered the coup claim that you were trying to subvert the constitution of 1982. What were you trying to do with the referendum that you were holding and is it true that as they say, your were trying to illegally extend your term?

MANUAL ZELAYA:[translated] That is completely false. In Honduras we do not have reelections and I never intended to be reelected. That will be a matter for another government, another constitution and another Constituent Assembly."

 

 

 

cjjdnc

"In other words, the Honduran President should "negotiate" with a military dictatorship while outside the country. Good job, President Obama. Way to talk out of one side of your mouth and watch events unfold in the opposite direction."

I think it's absolutely clear that the Obama Administration has been playing a game where they vocally denounce the coup, but nevertheless allow it to continue. Zelaya represents the new left in Latin America, epitomized by Chavez.

The U.S. has thus far played a very strong role in the deposition of the president, and has so far not even classified the event as a "coup," which would trigger an automatic freeze on all funds to Honduras.

Fidel

Thank you, thanks. I didnt realize Zelaya's intentions with the referendum until you posted that

[url=http://globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=14369]Canada Supports the Military Coup in Honduras[/url] by Ashley Holley

Quote:

Capitalizing on hurricane devastation

The answer begins with Canada's reaction to the last crisis in Honduras

In 1998, Hurricane Mitch swept through much of Central America and especially ravaged Honduras, where thousands of people were killed and millions were displaced. Already the second poorest country in the Western Hemisphere, Honduras was now struck with over $3 billion in damages, a loss of social services such as schools, hospitals and road systems. Seventy per cent of its agricultural crops were destroyed. Nothing so devastating had ever hit Honduras.

Canada was quick to respond to the cries for help following Hurricane Mitch, with a 'long-term development plan'. Canada offered $100 million over four years for reconstruction projects. These grandiose aid packages made Canada look like a savior. However, attached to this assistance was the introduction of over 40 Canadian companies to Honduras to assess opportunities for investment. This hurricane offered a strategic economic opportunity for Canadian investment in Honduras.

The Canadian government, as it officially stated this year, considers mineral extraction by Canadian mining companies one of the best ways to "create new economic opportunities in the developing world". Shortly after Hurricane Mitch weakened the Honduran state, Canada and the United States joined to establish the National Association of Metal Mining of Honduras (ANAMINH), through which they were able to rewrite the General Mining Law. This law provides foreign mining companies with lifelong concessions, tax breaks and subsurface land rights for "rational resource exploitation".

Life-long guarantees to Canadian mining companies in a time of desperate need for Hondurans. It works for them. It reminds us of 99 year leases granted to lumber companies operating in Canada and rock-bottom stumpage fees and to mostly to American ones. Northern Canada is strewn with ghost towns after mineral barons stripped the land bare of natural wealth and left the country with profits in hand. It's an old story here and a new one for Hondurans. The so-called free market has operated by a very visible hand of bought and paid-for stooges in government and always has. Talk about taking advantage of the misery of others. Shock doctrine again?

"When money arrives, all is green, bustle, and abundance. And when it leaves, all is trampled down, barren and bare" - old Chinese proverb

N.Beltov N.Beltov's picture

1. Two more people, both important leaders and activists from the citizenry, were murdered by the military regime.

E. Golinger wrote:
Over the weekend, two well-known social leaders were assassinated by the coup forces. Roger Bados leader of the Bloque Popular & the National Resistance Front against the coup d'etat, was killed in the northern city of San Pedro Sula. Approximately at 8pm on Saturday evening, Bados was assassinated and killed immediately by three gun shots. Bados was also a member of the leftist party, Democratic Unity (Unificación Democrática) and was president of a union representing workers in a cement factory. His death was denounced as part of the ambience and repressive actions taken by the coup government to silence all disent.

Ramon Garcia, another social leader in Honduras, was also killed on Saturday evening by military forces who boarded a bus he was riding in Santa Barbara and forced him off, subsequently shooting him and wounding his sister. Juan Barahona, National Coordinator of the Bloque Popular & the National Resistance Front against the coup, stated that these actions are committed by the coup government "as the only way to maintain themselves in power, by terrorizing and killing the people."

2. The national curfew remains and the regime continues to lie about lifting it.

3. Foreign journalists continue to be threatened, detained, and deported.

4. The military regime has hired high profile Yanqui "Democrats" to lobby on their behalf.

E. Golinger wrote:
Clinton lobbyist Lanny Davis, former Special Counsel for President Bill Clinton from 1996-1998, and close advisor to Hillary's campaign for president last year, has been hired by the Latin American Business Council - an ultraconservative group of Latin American businesses - to represent the coup leaders in the U.S.

Another Clinton era lobbyist "Bennett Ratcliff of San Diego, another close friend and advisor of the Clinton's, was also hired by the coup government in Honduras" as "advisor".

5. The demands by the butchers of Honduran democracy are as follows:

E.Golinger wrote:
1. Zelaya can return to the presidency, but not to power. The presidency and the exercise of power are two different things.
2. Zelaya must not pursue any plans to reform the Constitution or promote polls or referendums that give voice to the people.
3. Zelaya must distance himself substantially from President Chávez. "This is essential", they said.
4. Zelaya must share governance with the Congress and those in the coup regime until the elections in November.
5. Zelaya must give amnesty to all those involved in the coup.

1. a mock Presidency that will provide window dressing to the military regime;
2. a veto on any DISCUSSION on constitutional change; apparently,  the haven't finished killing the democratic pretensions of the Honduran citizenry;
3. join in the usual pathological anti-communist/anti-socialist xenophobia against more enlightened governments in Latin America;
4. See 1;
5. A free pass for the murderers of Roger Bados and Ramon Garcia, etc., etc., etc..

 

Erik Redburn

Nothing to add here, but I guess I should report that Layton's office did get back and informed me that, yes, they too condemn the illegal coup and call for Zelaya's return, as well as criticise the Canadian government's rather ambiguous response.  I'll post it here in full if its seen as appropriate by others.  Officialese but clear enough.   Now, if only they have enough gumption to publicise their views more widely.  

Erik Redburn

Well since there doesn't seem to be any protests at the idea, here it is:

 

Thank you for your recent email sharing your concerns about the situation in Honduras. We share your concern.

New Democrat Foreign Affairs Critic Paul Dewar has been monitoring the situation with great concern. We have joined other progressive voices around the globe in protesting the undemocratic removal of President Zelaya by a military coup d'état.

We are also concerned with Conservative Minister Peter Kent's comments on this matter. While the international community is united in condemning the coup, Minister Kent's comments are isolating Canada.

New Democrats have called on the government of Canada to unequivocally condemn the military coup and to urge authorities in Honduras to immediately return to constitutional normalcy. The Honduran authorities should reverse the coup by allowing Mr. Zelaya to return to his post as the democratically elected president of the country.

Once again, thank you for taking the time to share your concerns. All the best.

Sincerely,

Jack Layton, MP (Toronto-Danforth)

Leader, Canada's New Democrats

 

N.Beltov N.Beltov's picture

The NDP could improve that by making reference to the financial support that Canada is continuing to provide the military regime in Honduras. This stuff is sometimes disguised in "police exchange programs", "assistance in drafting laws that reflect Canada's view of 'freedom'" (i.e., rewriting mining laws to better allow Canadian corporations to loot the country), and so on. Canada sometimes plays the role of strong arming other countries into voting along with the USA in international bodies that decide matters of credit, loans and so on that can sometimes be critical to the success, and survival, of a government.

MP Kent was a juicy target, and could hardly be missed, but it 's good to see that the NDP leader actually identifies the events as a coup, and calls for the return of the elected President. The military regime is now trying to impose conditions on such a return ... whereby the President would be effectively hog tied from doing very much of anything.

M. Spector M. Spector's picture

Once again we have a demonstration of the time-honoured historical fact that a series of crisis events can cause the people directly affected to move radically to the left. A couple of months ago, Zelaya was just another left-liberal bourgeois politician, but events since then have quickly altered his consciousness (as well as that of hundrends of thousands of Hondurans).

Quote:
The deposed president of Honduras, Manuel Zelaya, has called for an "insurrection" in his country so he can be returned to power following the June 28 military coup.

"The Honduran people have the right to insurrection," said Zelaya, speaking in the neighbouring Central American country of Guatemala.

Zelaya said that insurrection was a legitimate democratic right "when faced with a usurping government and a coup-supporting military".

"I want to tell you to not leave the streets, that is the only space that they have not taken from us," he said, addressing supporters in Honduras.

Zelaya called for strikes, marches, takeovers, and civil disobedience in his country because that is necessary "when the democratic order of a country is disrupted." [url=

">http://au.news.yahoo.com/a/-/world/5726615]Source[/url]

So just as the "shock doctrine" can be used by reactionary forces in a crisis, so too can situations of crisis and disorder quickly lead to a steep rise in political consciousness. That's why it is so important for left political parties to be prepared to play a leadership role when unanticipated social upheaval occurs.

For example, those who would have the NDP follow, rather than lead, the Canadian working class, would see their party quickly overtaken and left behind by mass consciousness in the event of a major social/political crisis.

 

 

Fidel

M. Spector wrote:
So just as the "shock doctrine" can be used by reactionary forces in a crisis, so too can situations of crisis and disorder quickly lead to a steep rise in political consciousness. That's why it is so important for left political parties to be prepared to play a leadership role when unanticipated social upheaval occurs.

For example, those who would have the NDP follow, rather than lead, the Canadian working class, would see their party quickly overtaken and left behind by mass consciousness in the event of a major social/political crisis.

I think we need to keep in mind that Canada is right next door to that last bastion of rightwing conservatism in the world with ~36% of US voters pledging allegiance to the Republican Party. We have Washington style lobbying in Ottawa since Mulroney. The "soft power" influence that country has on Canadian government and public psyche is probably greater here than most other countries. The NDP would be treading where angels fear to go. And I wish the NDP would lead and be a stronger nationalist voice for workers.

I think that with all the natural wealth in this country at the disposal of the neoliberal ideologues and the corporations, and with big banks hitching along for the ride with debt-driven capitalism - Canada has a long way to go before that ideology totally wrecks the economy and carts away the last of the oil and gas and massive amounts of hydroelectric power potential. Canada will be a naturally rich country for a long time coming no matter how much they rob us blind in the mean time. It's not like Sweden after the lumber barons stripped that country bare of timber and other resources before social democrats appealed to the masses there. And things are not nearly as bad here as they were for Cubans leading up to the late 1950's. Not even close.

N.Beltov N.Beltov's picture

Eva Golinger, outstanding bloggist, has itemized a huge list outlining the EVIDENCE for Washington's involvement in the coup d'etat.

It's irrefutable.

Golinger wrote:
Nevertheless, the majority coincide in excusing the Obama Administration from any responsibility in the Honduran coup, blaming instead the lingering remains of the Bush-Cheney era and the war hawks that still pace the halls of the White House. The evidence demonstrates that while it is certain that the usual suspects who perpetrate coups and destabilization activities in Latin America are involved, ample proof exists confirming the direct role of the new administration in Washington in the Honduran coup.

Eat shit, liberals. This is your man.

NDPP

here's more of the same:

http://www.wsws.org/articles/2009/jul2009/hond-j15.shtml

Ex Clinton Aides Advising Honduras Coup Regime

"Ever since the military abducted President Manuel Zelaya at gunpoint on June 28 and expelled him from the country, the Obama administration has cast itself as a steadfast defender of "democracy" in Honduras. The real nature of that defense has become somewhat clearer with the news that key former aides to Secretary of State Hillary CLinton and her husband, former President Bill CLinton, have surfaced as top advisers to the illegal regime led by Robert Micheletti, which was installed by the coup..."

thanks

thanks for the updates here

NDPP

Who's Behind Lanny Davis' Putsch Paycheck?

http://narcosphere.narconews.com/notebook/bill-conroy/2009/07/whos-behin...

"Enter Lanny Davis - a longtime friend and Yale Law School chum of Hillary Clinton and former White House Counsel to Bill Clinton. Davis is now scampering about the Hill setting up meetings with Congressional insiders and throwing money around on advertising and other frills to build a case for supporting the new militarily elected Honduran regime.."

fiidel_castro

Well it is certainly no question that the forces of American imperialism, i.e. - free market capitalism, are still waging their brutal wars against Latin American nations and their leaders. The obvious link here is the US hatred toward Castro, Chavez, Morales, and the progressive socialist political movements that have been going on for over 6 decades in the various regions. The Honduras coup is nothing new all we have to do is remember Ronald Reagan (yes, the American actor)and the 1980's. Latin American countries have been factories for failed US attempts at implementing free market 'miracles' in countless previous situations.  These 'miracles' always turn out to be total social disasters where the people and their society are directly ruined but capital counts its gains. We must always have the role of capital in mind because that is the purpose of these reactionary-extremist actions. The military is propped up and armed by outside capital interests and in this case, as in many others, the US is behind the flow of capital and arms to the military. This is not conspiracy, it is truth. 

The real question to be asked is what does the US want this time with Honduras? I mean do they want cheap labour, resources, influence in the region, etc? Maybe they want a combination of all these things and this is important to understand about the coup. One thing is for sure, the US is directly involved in the military coup and I don't think that anyone is arguing any differently but capital growth for American elites (i.e. - corporations) is likely the reason. Well done to President Obama for standing by the failed policies of Ronald Reagan - it looks good on his resume. So much for the policies of "change" and "hope" that were promised. It only took a few months for the US to take several steps backward in their relationship with the 'other' America. Back to business as usual, now that is "change" we can believe in, am I right? 

N.Beltov N.Beltov's picture

Both political and economic factors come into play I think. The US regime is feverish and blinded by rage in its opposition to ANY alternative to "the Washington Consensus" (now rotting in the sewer) or the prescriptions of neo-liberalism for Latin America in general. The current Cuban, Venezuelan and Bolivian governments fills the strategists of Yanqui imperialism with apoplectic paroxyms. So, any other example, even a tiny one, turns them white with rage. Think of the Guiliani approach to crime in New York City; "no broken windows", etc., is really an extreme reaction to the tiniest misdemeanor. In El Salvador under the US-sponsored death squad regime in the 1980's, the penalty for drunk driving was death. Death. The possibility of a further poltical beachead just cannot be tolerated, especially given that the Honduran President was by no means on the left, or the "far left", and was simply opening the door to wider participation of the citizenry.

That's the political side of things. But, of course, powerful economic interests in Honduras are linked with the military's kidnapping and forcible deportation of the elected President, Aristide-style, to Costa Rica. Outside economic interests, including, no doubt, Canadian ones, come to bear. And that is just as important a factor as the political ones.

It's not by accident that we on the left use the term "political economy" in descriptions of social life; it's an antidote and remedy to bird-brained and tendentious attempts to compartmentalize knowledge in order to deny the obvious. Like a coup d'etat. My two bits.

Erik Redburn

N.Beltov wrote:

The NDP could improve that by making reference to the financial support that Canada is continuing to provide the military regime in Honduras. This stuff is sometimes disguised in "police exchange programs", "assistance in drafting laws that reflect Canada's view of 'freedom'" (i.e., rewriting mining laws to better allow Canadian corporations to loot the country), and so on. Canada sometimes plays the role of strong arming other countries into voting along with the USA in international bodies that decide matters of credit, loans and so on that can sometimes be critical to the success, and survival, of a government.

 

Thats not a bad point, Canadas role as Americas silent partner in the region could also use more public exposure, whether the broader public wants to hear it or not.

N.Beltov N.Beltov's picture

Well, it's objectively speaking, an anti-imperialist thrust. And that's far too radical for SOME in the NDP, never mind the Liberals or Conservatives. But it's always worth pushing these things, testing the boundaries of bourgeois politics, seeing how far/ how enlightened the parliamentary parties will be. In another discussion you might find me claiming that the easiest way to expose the failure of our Parliamentary parties is to delve into foreign/military policy; that's just the way it is for any so-called imperialist country like our own. But both of these can be true at the same time.

From my perspective as an unrepentant socialist, if the NDP doesn't move in this direction then it's just as useful to point out their (expected) failure in that regard. It provides prima facie evidence why Canada needs a successful party on the NDPs left; someone has to put forward a policy motivated by solidarity instead of profits and that is, after all, the duty of the left, no matter how small the numbers.

Fidel

Another left wing party would have the effect of fracturing the left even moreso by our current  FPP electoral system. A PR system, however, should unite the left. And that's why the two old line parties voted down the NDP's proposal to restart a federal study on electoral reform in May of 2007.

NorthReport

Here we go again.

 

I wish the guy well, but I'm not optimistic.

 

If he couldn't even arrange to land his plane last week, what chance does he realistically have for success.

 

 

Aide: Ousted President en Route to Honduras

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/2009/07/16/world/AP-LT-Honduras-Coup.htm...

N.Beltov N.Beltov's picture

Golinger wrote:
The Committee of Family Members of Detained and Disappeared in Honduras published a report today detailing more than 1155 cases of Human Rights violations committed by the coup regime since June 28, 2009. Of those, there have been 4 political assassinations, 6 gravely injured, 16 threatened with death, 59 injured, 13 media outlets closed or censored, 14 journalists detained, of which the majority have been expelled forcefully from the country, and 1046 arbitrary detentions. Where are the State Department reports on human rights violations now? They are always quick to condemn Venezuela for made up violations in order to demonize the government, but when real violations and crimes are committed by a repressive regime favored by Washington, then the policy is silence.

The Obama administration is also pumping up, in a gigantic way, the US military presence in Colombia ... right next door to Venezuela.

Quote:
This makes clear that the Obama Administration is continuing directly on the same militarization path as the previous administrations and it is paving the way for the provocation of a major conflict in the region. Will the empire never listen?

I think Mott the Hoople described the psychology of the Empire very well in one  of their songs ...

Quote:
Violence, violence

It's the only thing that will make you see sense

Violence, violence

It's the only thing that will make you see sense

 

Fidel

http://soaw.org

Quote:
The situation in Honduras is getting worse each day since the SOA graduate-led military coup against the government of President Manuel Zelaya.

The Committee of Family Members of Detained and Disappeared in Honduras (COFADEH) published a report yesterday, detailing hundreds of cases of human rights abuses committed by the coup regime, including four political assassinations. You can take a stand against this injustice right now: http://www.soaw.org/contactcongress

The colder war on democracy continues

NDPP

Secretary Clinton  Doesn't Get the Power of Non Violence in Honduras

http://narcosphere.narconews.com/thefield/secretary-clinton-doesn't-get-power-nonviolence-honduras

"As thousands of Honduran citizens peacefully blockaded the central highways of their nation yesterday, bringing its commerce under a coup regime to a halt, US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton met in Washington with her Canadian and Mexican counterparts.."

NDPP

Chiquita in Latin America

http://informationclearinghouse.info/article23088.htm

"When the Honduran military overthrew the democratically elected government of Manuel Zelaya two weeks ago there might have been a sigh of relief in the corporate board rooms of Chiquita bananas. Earlier this year the Cincinatti based fruit company joined Dole in criticizing  the government in Tegucigalpa which had raised the minimum wage by 60%..."

M. Spector M. Spector's picture

Eva Golinger, on July 18, wrote:
The talks are done for today with no agreement. Zelaya's delegation confirmed they are accepting considering the proposal set out by Oscar Arias (see below), beginning with President Zelaya's return to power by July 24th (by continuing to push back the date, the coup regime consolidates and represses the people even more). The coup regime led by Roberto Micheletti has stated it will "study" the proposal overnight, though it has already had 15 hours to do so today, without arriving at a final decision. Several of the spokespeople for the coup regime have said they will not agree to President Zelaya's return to power, which makes things difficult because that is the principle issue at stake here. The talks will be resumed tomorrow morning at 11am, Costa Rica time. See below for my analysis...

UPDATE: President Zelaya has accepted Arias' offer - with all its massive, dangerous flaws - but, so far, it will not proceed because the coup dictator, Roberto Micheletti, has refused the terms set forth today in the negotiation meeting in Costa Rica. The coup regime stands firm on its refusal to allow President Zelaya to return to power. Supporters of Zelaya and popular resistance forces are still in the streets in Honduras. Zelaya says his return to Honduras - by any means and way - is imminent.

ORIGINAL POST:

The "dialogue" meetings on the Honduras crisis are taking place today in Costa Rica, mediated by the president of that nation, Oscar Arias, who was designed by the Department of State to assume this role. Arias has presented a "document" to both parties, which include representatives from the coup regime and the constitutional government that was ousted in the coup 21 days ago on June 28th. The document, is calling on all parties to accept the following seven terms in order to resolve the political crisis:

1. Allow President Manuel Zelaya to return to his post as president until the end of his term on January 29, 2010.

2. Conform a new government (with Zelaya as president) based on "unity" and "reconciliation", composed on representatives from all political parties in the country to govern through the end of Zelaya's term.

3. Declare a general amnesty to those actors involved in the coup d'etat.

4. President Zelaya will have to renounce any effort to convene a referendum or consultation with the people of Honduras regarding future constitutional reform.

5. Hold early elections during the last weekend of October instead of November 29th, 2009.

6. The military will be commanded by the Supreme Court of Honduras as of September 2009 in order to "ensure" a smooth electoral process.

7. Creation of a truth commission composed of renowned Hondurans and members from the international community, particularly the Organization of American States (OEA) to supervise the correct return of constitutional order and the implementation of the above terms.

President Zelaya has apparently accepted these terms, despite the fact that he would be completely castrated politically, and would be allowing for the same criminals that executed the coup against him to remain in power and in fact, have even more power since they would be part of a "government of unity and reconciliation". If this is true, Zelaya will be strongly disappointing a large majority of those Honduran people who have resisted and struggled against the coup government now for over 21 days. Also, many of us in the international community will also be severely bothered by Zelaya's giving in to such absolutely ridiculous and unacceptable terms!!

Personally, I believe the only issue to be considered is the first one, and it should involve the unconditional, immediate return of President Zelaya to power - that is the only matter at hand here. Also, the OAS resolution on the Honduran coup specifically called for the immediate, UNCONDITIONAL, restitution of President Zelaya to power. What Arias (via Washington) is proposing involves a series of conditions that would render Zelaya absolutely powerless.

Obviously, this is what many of us have been expected from Arias (via Washington) since he assumed this role as "mediator". This is precisely the outcome the Obama administration has been pushing for since day one of the coup. And it is absolutely unacceptable!

First of all, the issue of a government of "unity" and "reconciliation" is ridiculous. That means Zelaya does not name his cabinet members, and all those who previously held positions in his government would be forced to step down. This measure ties Zelaya's hands completely and is just outrageous.

The renouncing of considering a possible future constitutional reform is also unacceptable, since that is not an issue to be decided by a small elite in Honduras, but rather the people of Honduras.

And then the amnesty for the coup leaders sets a dangerous precedent for other actors seeking to overthrow their governments via illegal means, because they will see that it can be done, and you get off the hook for all the crimes and human rights violations committed!!

This is all just really awful. The worst part will be if Zelaya actually does accept this proposal as is being reported right now.

I believe the only viable solution is for the people of Honduras to immediately convene a constitutional assembly and to not only rewrite their constitution as they see fit, but also to depose the congress, supreme court and high military command, since they have all been principal participants in a violent, criminal coup d'etat. Once the new constitution is ratified, elections will be held to fill all offices as specified by law. The power resides in the sovereign people to determine the type and model of government they wish to have. If Honduras allows this coup to be legitimated by Arias' (via Washington's) proposal, it will be a dark day for the peoples of Latin America.

[url=http://www.chavezcode.com/2009/07/mediator-arias-calls-for-amnesty-for.h...

NDPP

Zelaya Accepts Unity Government Proposal

http://www.ottawacitizen.com/news/Honduras+Zelaya+accepts+unity+governme...

"Honduras' ousted President Manuel Zelaya agreed on Saturday to a power sharing government as a way out of his country's political crisis, but his enemies rejected any deal that puts him back in the presidency.."

Honduras: The Nonviolent Battle for the Zelaya Home in Catacamas

http://narcosphere.narconews.com/thefield/honduras-nonviolent-battle-zel...

"While the negotiation circus continues up above - there is a more outcome determinative struggle going on from below. We have received many reports from other regions of Honduras that indicate the same level of unity, planning and discipline at play from the public and the same panicked overreaction from the coup regime.."

Pages

Topic locked