Does the Sask. NDP even CARE anymore?

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Leftfield

Aristotleded24 wrote:

Ken Burch wrote:
Leftfield wrote:
I tend to think that the NDP's problems go deeper than historic shifts. Thinking back 30 years ago, among my peers (say my scout troop I was involved in as a teen) with one exception there wasn't a conservative in the bunch. Few of them would line up to the modern understanding of a New Democrat today. There was and is something socially wrong in the NDP. I feel like they ran eccentric single men in family neighbourhoods, old social gospel preachers in new young areas, socialists in heavily Catholic areas, and union bosses who couldn't lead their members. A number of those people were real bastards too. Ticking boxes that made one a good New Democrat was often more important than picking people who were good members of the community. Quite a few of the current crop of MLAs are career politicians or children of activists. Not relatable to average people.

Is "eccentric single men" meant to be a euphemism for openly gay men there?

I took Leftfield's post to mean that the Saskatchewan NDP doesn't really have the pulse on the public mood or the demographic makeup of the province, and as a result tends to select candidates that are not particularly well suited to the individual ridings.

Yep.  As far as I know, the guy I was thinking of is straight.  

 

Ken Burch Ken Burch's picture

Appreciate the clarification.  You can see someone elsewhere might take that phrase as a euphemism.

Leftfield

Ken Burch wrote:

Appreciate the clarification.  You can see someone elsewhere might take that phrase as a euphemism.

Yep, poorly choosen wording on my part.  I was trying to think of a different way to say "peculiar personality"  for the person I was thinking of.  

Misfit Misfit's picture

Idiosyncratic? Kook? Odd? Boring and awkward? A misfit like me?

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Will Sask NDP support oil industry or Indigenous land rights?

quote:

But, a day after Meili’s June social media post in support of the camp, the Saskatchewan NDP announced their new Chief of Staff – the first major hire since Meili’s campaign victory in the March party leadership race. Meili’s choice for what is arguably the most powerful unelected position in the party was Olin Valby, a Texas-based oil industry manager working for TransCanada Corp, and a former staffer in the NDP Calvert administration.

quote:

“Valby has been trusted by the oil industry to shepherd over 75 pipeline and facility projects through stakeholder engagement and scoping,” says Emily Eaton, a researcher on Saskatchewan’s oil economy. She’s hesitant to embrace the congratulatory tide. Eaton predicts that Valby will leverage this experience as chief of staff in one of two ways: “Either he will adopt the Alberta NDP’s form of ‘new climate denialism’, where decision-makers employ pro-climate science rhetoric while continuing to deny what climate science actually means for policy. Or he will use his insider knowledge of the oil industry to undermine its power and influence in this province.”

Eaton warns that if he follows the first path, “the NDP will continue its historic support of the oil industry while attempting to manage the people and movements who oppose the unfettered growth of the industry.” She says, “as we have seen in Alberta, this would mean supporting oil development on Indigenous lands with little respect for the rights of Indigenous peoples to free, prior, and informed consent.”

She continues, “If he follows the second path, we can finally start moving towards the sustainable economies we all need. Our future generations need him to do the latter,” adding that “but doing so would betray the industry that has employed him for the last decade.”

quote:

There is a calculus for even well-intentioned settler politicians who aspire to power in Saskatchewan and beyond: don’t step up to bat for decolonization in practice, because the voters won’t support it. There is an infrastructure, both inside and outside of political parties, that sweeps “progressive” politicians to the centre, away from accountability to Indigenous peoples and their lands – and away from ecological sanity and social justice. Such politicians would not attain political power in this system otherwise. Are we seeing this in real time with the current Saskatchewan NDP?

Talk of “reconciliation” is too often divorced from the practical recognition of Indigenous people’s rights to the land. This is the ugly underbelly of the “reconciliation” industry. To his credit, Meili has demonstrated public support for the Justice For Our Stolen Children camp since June 13th – but the next day he appointed an oil manager from TransCanada Corp as his chief of staff. The question is: how does one so easily separate stolen children from stolen land, with a chief of staff whose career has been built on colonial resource extraction?

Ken Burch Ken Burch's picture

Leftfield wrote:

Ken Burch wrote:

Appreciate the clarification.  You can see someone elsewhere might take that phrase as a euphemism.

Yep, poorly choosen wording on my part.  I was trying to think of a different way to say "peculiar personality"  for the person I was thinking of.  

I understand.  And these days, it seems to be very difficult to find a term for the sort of guy you were trying to describe that won't be offensive to someone or carry some sort of unintended meaning. 

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Quote:
And these days, it seems to be very difficult to find a term for the sort of guy you were trying to describe that won't be offensive to someone or carry some sort of unintended meaning.

Are people sort of getting a bit too sensitive?  Or else what do you mean here?

progressive17 progressive17's picture

NDPs are like Leafs fans. "We did something in the 1960s!"

Ken Burch Ken Burch's picture

Mr. Magoo wrote:

Quote:
And these days, it seems to be very difficult to find a term for the sort of guy you were trying to describe that won't be offensive to someone or carry some sort of unintended meaning.

Are people sort of getting a bit too sensitive?  Or else what do you mean here?

No, not TOO sensitive.  More aware, in some ways, more attentive. 

And a lot of people feel they no longer have to put up with slights and acts of disrespect they used to be pressured to be "good sports" about, or didn't have the power in society to ask people not to do to them anymore.

You just want me to say they're "too sensitive" so you can work in your smug, dismissive "you're all being silly" thing again.  Sorry, not gonna play.  

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Quote:
You just want me to say they're "too sensitive" so you can work in your smug, dismissive "you're all being silly" thing again.  Sorry, not gonna play.

I would totally settle for you finding that term for that guy (that won't offend anyone).

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