Is it time for a new NDP Leader in Manitoba?

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Aristotleded24

Ken Burch wrote:
It's a little surprising that the Greens aren't trying to cut into the NDP vote by standing on a strongly anti-austerity program.  You'd think they would realize that the "Tories with composters" vote they try for in Albeta doesn't exist in Manitoba, and that most of the growth potential they do have is from disappointed voters on the NDP left wing.

Would you care to provide some actual evidence for your post, rather than your continued pontificating from afar about what each party is doing and what is going on in a country where you don't even live?

In any case, can you tell me what is [url=http://greenparty.mb.ca/introduction/]right-wing or pro-austerity about a platform that includes:[/url]

Quote:

  • promotes a clean energy strategy that stresses money-saving efficiency and clean energy sources like solar, wind, and geothermal.
  • makes local industries a priority. Responsible economic development means keeping production close to home and keeping it clean. Greens support a healthy, non-polluting agriculture sector, and natural resource development that respects the limits of nature.
  • values a compassionate society that tackles poverty and injustice effectively. The Greens endorse a restorative justice approach to dealing with crime and its victims.
  • will create more employment opportunities in a diverse green economy that will include local, high-tech innovation.

In particular, please explain how post 3 is right wing, considering the high rates of poverty and people locked up in jail that have happened under this government's watch, and how Andrew Swan as an NDP Justice Minister tried to out-Harper Harper on crime?

Ken Burch Ken Burch's picture

Thank you for the information. 

If they add a commitment to anti-scab legislation, that could be compelling.

Ken Burch Ken Burch's picture

Thank you for the information. 

If they add a commitment to anti-scab legislation, that could be compelling.

genstrike

Ken Burch wrote:

Thank you for the information. 

If they add a commitment to anti-scab legislation, that could be compelling.

If the NDP added a commitment to anti-scab legislation, that would also be compelling.

Unionist

genstrike wrote:

Ken Burch wrote:

Thank you for the information. 

If they add a commitment to anti-scab legislation, that could be compelling.

If the NDP added a commitment to anti-scab legislation, that would also be compelling.

Better (half a century) late than never!

 

genstrike

Unionist wrote:

Better (half a century) late than never!

Hmmm, with a few tweaks, that could be the NDP's campaign slogan this election.  "Progress:  Better a decade and a half late than never!"

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

delete

Ken Burch Ken Burch's picture

genstrike wrote:

Ken Burch wrote:

Thank you for the information. 

If they add a commitment to anti-scab legislation, that could be compelling.

If the NDP added a commitment to anti-scab legislation, that would also be compelling.

Agreed.  My point was that adding that would make the Greens MORE pro-worker than the NDP.

Aristotleded24

Former Cabinet Minister publishes ironically-titled book detailing the plot against Selinger:

Quote:
Gord Mackintosh, who was a cabinet minister the entire time the NDP was in power between 1999 and 2016, details the behind-the-scenes arguments that led to a revolt by other cabinet ministers in 2014 and to a convention at which Selinger hung on to his position as party leader by 33 votes.

Mackintosh's new book "Stories Best Left Untold" comes out May 23 and covers his youth in Fort Frances, Ont., his time as a lawyer advising Elijah Harper on opposing the Meech Lake accord and his service in a variety of cabinet portfolios such as justice, conservation and family services.

The book reveals cabinet discussions about Selinger's controversial move to raise the provincial sales tax and the ensuing effort to dump him to revive the party's sagging poll numbers.

Selinger had promised in the 2011 election campaign not to raise the sales tax, but the government was in a cash crunch and needed money, Mackintosh writes. Weeks before the 2013 budget, cabinet ministers had options they thought would be more palatable to the public: income tax increases on high-earners or a series of smaller tax and levy increases that would, combined, raise as much money.

Selinger didn't listen to warnings the public would be angry at the broken promise and a major public relations campaign would be needed to sell the increase, Mackintosh writes.

I adamantly disagree with his characterization of Gary Doer. For all the talk about different approaches, remember that  Selinger served as Doer's right hand man in Finance as they continued the tax cut policies of the prior Filmon government, which undermined the treasury to the point that was used to justify the need for the PST increase, even though the CCPA documented that the tax cuts the NDP handed out would have covered the deficit for one year. The party has for decades been a top-down organization controlled by the leadership, with the job of a member being to shut up, give money and free labour at election time, and cheer on the Glorious Leader. The fact that the NDP went from an historically high seat count to an historically low one in one election cycle really speaks to the gutting of the grassroots capabilities that would have saved party seats when the times got rough. The difference was charm. Doer was able to charm people in a very sleazy and underhanded way, while Selinger in my view always lacked the warmth, charm and charisma one expects to find in a common piece of particle board.

The real reason for the difference in the popularity of the 2 men is timing. Doer was in Opposition at a time when federal government transfers were cut and provinces were taking it out on their populations, and became Premier at around the time that federal transfers increased. Very easy to be popular in those circumstances. Doer left around the time of the financial crash when government finances collapsed along the way. Any Premier under those circumstances would have lost popularity as they alienated people with tough decisions needed to address the crisis, as Brad Wall is learning the hard way next door. Doer had the good sense to leave and have someone else clean up the mess. Even though Doer may enjoy the popularity he experienced at the time, I think history will judge his legacy much more harshly, given the high rates of poverty, the large numbers of Aboriginals locked up in jail, the rural countryside being destroyed by hog barns, and no moves to make unionizing easier or ban replacement workers during a strike or lockout. He also gets to enjoy himself while Pallister is currently undoing the positive aspects of Doer's legacy such as Neighbourhoods Alive!

In any case, I do hope to read the book when it comes out.

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