rabble.ca's vegan challenge II

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Timebandit Timebandit's picture

I dunno, wz, it seems to me that stuff like this is largely preaching to the choir.  Do you really think it will make much difference?  Would someone who doesn't already put some energy toward mindful eating be inclined to participate?

MegB

al-Qa'bong wrote:

Damned, shmamned, I'm a G.B. Shaw vegetarian: "I prefer not to dine on corpses."

Hmm ... that made me think about what I eat in a way I hadn't before ... I'm a scavenger, a carrion-feeder.  I eat animals that are 'pre-klilled'.  Mind you, I'm paying someone to kill tasty animals that I can eat, but by definition I'm eating carrion.

Cool. And a little disturbing.

So, I guess we can say that most of the West, in the northern hemisphere at least, are carrion-feeders.  Some are gatherers as well, some are scavengers as well, but most of the human species is either gatherer or hunter-gatherer (I'm using 'hunter' to stand for people who raise, slaughter and eat their own animal products, not just hunting and killing wild animals).

We're apex predators, by and large (which doesn't mean we don't get eaten - humans and other apex predators will snack on human flesh when necessary), but we have choice.  We can do what is demonstrably wrong - consume without thought - or we can pay attention to how our choices impact the planet.  Moral or pragmatic, it's something we have to do.

6079_Smith_W

As I was driving home yesterday there was an interview on CBC radio (Manitoba) with a fellow who was going celibate for six months.

Never mind that he was talking about half a year rather than a week, I doubt that anyone in the world would accuse him of trying to drive humanity into extinction. 

Likewise, I have never considered judaism a conspiracy against my enjoyment of bacon, scallops or beef stroganoff.

I am normally pretty vocal about those who consider moderate meat-eating evil, but  this is kind of ridiculous. Vegetarianism is fine. Veganism is fine, and we are just talking about a week-long exercise here. 

I don't understand why anyone would feel threatened by what is in essence a great idea.

 

Timebandit Timebandit's picture

I'm not threatened - I just dislike the tone and I think the premise is silly.  I respond the same way to fundamentalists who make the assumption they are making morally superior choices to the rest of us. 

I don't think I've ever been asked to take the kosher challenge... 

Snert Snert's picture

Quote:
Of course, many babblers have been providing trolls with tasty vegan recipes over the years. 

If all those recipes could be extracted from the archives and edited into a cookbook, wouldn't that make a totally hilarious fundraiser?

"Fuck Off Troll:  A Collection of Beloved Recipes from Canada's Left"

I'm not really joking, btw.  I'd totally drop a few coins on a cookbook like that.

Bacchus

Actually so would I. Not to mention drop a few recipes off (like spicy baked potato skins or cucumber shooters). Im in a foodie frame of mind since I just got back from New Orleans

6079_Smith_W

Timebandit wrote:

I'm not threatened - I just dislike the tone and I think the premise is silly.  I respond the same way to fundamentalists who make the assumption they are making morally superior choices to the rest of us. 

I don't think I've ever been asked to take the kosher challenge... 

I'm sort of with you (if you trundle over to the most recent seal-killing thread you can see where I stand on that). 

I see this strictly as a health and discipline issue. It there is a moral superior tone, implied or inferred, I am ignoring it. I have met some vegetarians who are judgmental and condescending about it, but The vast majority I know (including the one I sleep with every night) are not.

And besides, there are veggie mega-industries - corn, for one - which can certainly rival meat for envorinmental destruction. That is not the issue, IMO.

Regardless of the motive, I htink it is a good idea. Hey, I know enough alcoholics who give up drink for lent just to prove that they can.

al-Qa'bong

Quote:

Can I also point out that, contrary to the complaints about obnoxious omnivores in the veg thread, you're being a lot more confrontational about my food choices than I am about yours?

How so?  I thought I was being rather laissez-faire here.  In an earlier post I said this isn't about being an absolutist and if you want to eat meat in the midst of taking the challenge, go ahead.

Sineed

Snert wrote:

"Fuck Off Troll:  A Collection of Beloved Recipes from Canada's Left"

I'm not really joking, btw.  I'd totally drop a few coins on a cookbook like that.

Fun!  I'd totally contribute recipes to that.

I'm thinking of doing the vegan challenge as an excuse to inflict wheat gluten upon the family once again.  So far, we're underwhelmed, but I've still got half a kilogram of wheat gluten powder (which expands massively - if we can like it, it's sure a cheap source of protein).

BTW, I'd welcome more recipes for wheat gluten/seitan, or links to same.  I've tried some internet recipes, and again, not great.

al-Qa'bong

Quote:

So far, we're underwhelmed, but I've still got half a kilogram of wheat gluten powder (which expands massively - if we can like it, it's sure a cheap source of protein).

Really?  I didn't know about that.  I make seitan the hard way, washing starch out of the dough.  Gluten powder always seemed kinda strange and processed to me (yet I even eat TVP), so I never gave it a try.

6079_Smith_W

al-Qa'bong wrote:

Quote:

I make seitan the hard way, washing starch out of the dough.  Gluten powder always seemed kinda strange and processed to me (yet I even eat TVP), so I never gave it a try.

I arrived at the tail end of a meal at a friend's house where they made their gluten that way (seems kinda wasteful to me, though it is one thing I would like to make one of these days). The only times I have had it fresh is chewing up wheat gum from grain out at the farm. 

I also like TVP as a chili or lasagna additive - never had it as a powder. And canned gluten/mockduck from chinatown is a guilty pleasure of mine.

Strangely enough, my mostly veggie partner turns her nose up at TVP. Go figure.

Life, the unive...

6079_Smith_W wrote:

As I was driving home yesterday there was an interview on CBC radio (Manitoba) with a fellow who was going celibate for six months.

Never mind that he was talking about half a year rather than a week, I doubt that anyone in the world would accuse him of trying to drive humanity into extinction. 

Likewise, I have never considered judaism a conspiracy against my enjoyment of bacon, scallops or beef stroganoff.

I am normally pretty vocal about those who consider moderate meat-eating evil, but  this is kind of ridiculous. Vegetarianism is fine. Veganism is fine, and we are just talking about a week-long exercise here. 

I don't understand why anyone would feel threatened by what is in essence a great idea.

 

 

 

I certainly don't feel threatened.  I am a bit offended by the massive inaccuracies, pretense of ecological and moral superiority and condescension though.

Catchfire Catchfire's picture

You know, I haven't seen any evidence of presumed "moral superiority" or condescension displayed here, or by any vegans I know. Maybe we know different vegans.

al-Qa'bong

Quote:

I also like TVP as a chili or lasagna additive - never had it as a powder.

Sorry if it seemed as if I implied that. I don't know of TVP in a powdered form. I use it in granules insuch things as chili and shepherd's pie, and as big hunks ("Nutrela" is a brand name) in stews, etc.

Life, the unive...

Catchfire wrote:

You know, I haven't seen any evidence of presumed "moral superiority" or condescension displayed here, or by any vegans I know. Maybe we know different vegans.

The very premises behind the vegan challenge are based on a presumed moral superiority and the call to the action is filled with condescension to those who believe that a vegan diet has nothing to do with the environment.

6079_Smith_W

Life, the universe, everything wrote:

Catchfire wrote:

You know, I haven't seen any evidence of presumed "moral superiority" or condescension displayed here, or by any vegans I know. Maybe we know different vegans.

The very premises behind the vegan challenge are based on a presumed moral superiority and the call to the action is filled with condescension to those who believe that a vegan diet has nothing to do with the environment.

I'm sorry, but I call B.S. on that. 

There are moral/religious grounds reasons for it. There are environmental reasons. There are health reasons, or there are self-disciplinary reasons. Take your pick.

If you don't want to do it, fine, but you have no reason to dump all over those who are promoting this, or any other awareness campaign. It's none of your business.

Geez... getting sensitive about (presumed) moral superiority. Who'da thunk it?

al-Qa'bong

@ Life, the Universe...[I posted at the same time as Winston]

Thanks for the insight.

You've nicely explained the haranguing I recieve from meat-eaters whenever they discover I'm a vegetarian.  Apparently they see my very existence as a moral judgement against which they feel compelled to argue.

Here's a newsflash:  it's not about you.

Life, the unive...

Sorry, but it was made my business when an organization I support financially is basing an "awareness" campaign on a false construct.   I have ZERO problem with anyone who wants to be vegan, or try to do the challenge and experience a vegan diet.  Knock youselves out.  I have stated this over and over.  What I do have a problem with the premise of the campaign (Get it the campaign- not being a vegan- but specifically this campaign)  The campaign is making specific claims, which I have outlined a number of times that are not truthful.  It is a bit like sponsoring a car race to promote stopping the oil sands.  

But thanks for proving my point though by attacking me instead of addressing concerns that have been raised.

6079_Smith_W

You know what? You are not the only person who supports this organization, and making a donation is like any gratuity. It doesn't mean you run the joint.

Nor should it, FFS. That's the classic "I don't want my taxes going to that" argument.

Donations, by definition, are not a quid pro quo, and they don't give you a seat on the editorial board. Thank god.

 

Pogo Pogo's picture

Okay, but I expect a cheeseburger for the planet promotion soon.

Life, the unive...

I didn't say I owned anything.  You asked me what business it was of mine.  So I answered you directly.  As a donor I have a vested interest in the stands the organization makes and if it makes wrong ones I have a right to critique them.  That is all I have done.  I haven't said change or I withdraw.   I haven't taken my marbles and gone home, nor have I attacked anyone (unlike you) what I have done is question the tone and nature of the campaign.  That's what I was talking about in post #62.  And I have done it from the perspective of having spent a life time growing food in a sustainable manner and following food, environmental and labour issues in food production for over 40 years.   I have attacked no one, I have suggested that vegans and vegetarians are often subjected to unfair prejudice, but I have been clear that the underlying assumptions of this campaign are not correct.  Nor have I questioned any other aspect of a person's individual decision to become vegan.  What I have challenged is the specific claim that a vegan diet is better for the environment.   That is very simply put not true.

So yet again what I said is that the campaign is based on untruths and that makes it a problem.  Want to deal with that, or does it make you feel better to attack me?

 

RosaL

Life, the universe, everything wrote:

I don't know RosaL I sell vegetables and fruit to, know and work with a number of vegans and have done so for many, many years.   I hear those environmental concerns about as often as the animal suffering issue.  I expect it entirely depends on the person.  What motivates you might not be what motivates others.   I'm still of the to each their own position, but I really resent the environmental agruments because they are so demonstrably false, yet they are insisted upon all the time.

I think a lot of vegans believe they are more likely to get people to take them seriously if they start with the environmental argument (appealing to their self-interest and the cause of the moment) so they mention that one first. (Clearly, they are wrong!) A lot of vegans will also make health arguments. I'm sure these are considerations for some people but I still maintain that animal suffering is the core motivation for the vast majority.

note to Snert: I've seen a lot of cattle close up and I don't find them even remotely "cute and cuddly"! 

yet another note to those who make the 'moral superiority' argument: Do you have any moral or ethical beliefs? Any political convictions? (If you don't, I can't imagine what you're doing here.) I promise you that anyone who disagrees with you concerning said beliefs or convictions or considers them unimportant finds your 'assumption of moral superiority' intolerable! 

Timebandit Timebandit's picture

If we look at the thread's context - rabble.ca promoting veganism as a way to be more environmentally friendly - then the criticism is not out of line.

The health and animal cruelty arguments are actually not relevant to the context of this thread or its predecessor.  Life(etc) is making a perfectly valid criticism in that the premise the challenge is based on is false, and commenting on the more-enronmentalist-than-thou attitude that some environmentalist vegans adopt.  It's clearly implied in the challenge that not being vegan is not "supporting the planet" (if I recall correctly how it was put).

I have no idea why this is being taken as a personal criticism.

RosaL

Timebandit wrote:

If we look at the thread's context - rabble.ca promoting veganism as a way to be more environmentally friendly - then the criticism is not out of line.

The health and animal cruelty arguments are actually not relevant to the context of this thread or its predecessor.  Life(etc) is making a perfectly valid criticism in that the premise the challenge is based on is false, and commenting on the more-enronmentalist-than-thou attitude that some environmentalist vegans adopt.  It's clearly implied in the challenge that not being vegan is not "supporting the planet" (if I recall correctly how it was put).

Many (most) who have posted in these two threads have have extended their remarks well beyond the environmental argument to vegetarianism and veganism and - indeed, vegetarians and vegans - in general. If people had commented only on the environmental arguments, I would have said nothing. 

polly bee

al-Qa'bong wrote:

 

There appears to be a misconception about how difficult it is to become a vegetarian. If you really want to do it, it's easy. I never felt an urge to eat meat after going herbie. Indeed, after a few months the idea of eating an animal's flesh became completely repulsive to me, and has stayed that way over 20 years later. I have about as much desire to eat the muscles of an animal as I have to eat its dung.

 

Agree wholeheartedly.  I find meat and meat products kind of thick and chewy and gaggy now. Have gacked a couple of times after finding them in what was supposed to be a meat free something-or-other.

Rosa - I completely respect your stand.  I was one of those who came to veganism by way of repairing my health, but have come around since to seeing it from the animal cruelty POV.  In any case, it's a personal decision and I admire you for standing up for what you believe in.

(sorry for the edit I hit post too soon)

RevolutionPlease RevolutionPlease's picture

Catchfire wrote:

You know, I haven't seen any evidence of presumed "moral superiority" or condescension displayed here, or by any vegans I know. Maybe we know different vegans.

 

It's gone both ways here CF.  Jokes about vegans.  Posts about animal corpses and animal dung slung about.  There's been plenty that hasn't helped this discussion.

 

I eat meat but appreciate this discussion.  It is about awareness.  It should also be an honest discussion.  Both sides are guilty of hyperbole.  Hopefully, some could use more tact, if we're genuine about engaging.

al-Qa'bong

Quote:

 Posts about animal corpses and animal dung slung about.

Clearly, you missed my meaning. I said that one was as appealing as the other to me, while describing how easy it was for me to go without eating meat. I didn't bring anyone else's preference into it.

6079_Smith_W

Life, the universe, everything wrote:

I didn't say I owned anything.  You asked me what business it was of mine. 

So yet again what I said is that the campaign is based on untruths and that makes it a problem.  Want to deal with that, or does it make you feel better to attack me?

No attack at all. I'm just delaing with a misconception.

This is an open forum, and the fact that you might have given financial support doesn't give you any more sway than anyone else. There are plenty of things on here that I disagree with, but I usually don't make a big deal about it.

As for the issue itself, I don't care what you might think about some peoples' reasons for promoting vegan week; it is perfectly valid for any number of reasons, including that someone might just want to do it because he or she feels like it. I'm surprised that (like so many issues) it is being judged relative to other things instead of based on its own merit. 

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

I wish it was a vegetarian challenge instead. I don't personally know anyone interested in going vegan (probably they have no idea what "vegan" means), but I have lots of vegetarian friends, and I go mostly vegetarian every summer for almost three months once the garden stuff ripens.

RevolutionPlease RevolutionPlease's picture

al-Qa'bong wrote:

Quote:

 Posts about animal corpses and animal dung slung about.

Clearly, you missed my meaning. I said that one was as appealing as the other to me, while describing how easy it was for me to go without eating meat. I didn't bring anyone else's preference into it.

 

I didn't miss anything, it was clearly as hyperbolic as the jokes you and I both objected too.

 

I can agree to disagree but I found it not helpful.  You're just dancing around your words and not taking ownership.

 

Unless I'm still missing it somehow?  And that's quite possible with me.  Perhaps you could explain how that language was useful?

 

Should I try to parse the fact that your precious plant corspes wouldn't be possible without that dung?

 

Can we reach a happy medium?

RevolutionPlease RevolutionPlease's picture

Boom Boom wrote:

I wish it was a vegetarian challenge instead. I don't personally know anyone interested in going vegan (probably they have no idea what "vegan" means), but I have lots of vegetarian friends, and I go mostly vegetarian every summer for almost three months once the garden stuff ripens.

 

Same here Boom Boom.  I'm interested in changing my diet.  This rabble challenge in Canada would be much more successful in the fall. 

 

Let's throw the shoe on the other foot.  In Canada, in the winter,  wouldn't the environment benefit from us hunting our food locally as no local produce is available, while ethically, locally harvested meat is?  I'm not about to go buy vegetables imported from around the world in April.  It does seem like a false start initiative.

 

This is really an interesting subject and I've learned tonnes already reading these threads.

 

Thanks for the discussion.

 

 

 

 

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

Folks around these parts are snaring rabbits in the snow by the bushel full. I'm waiting to be given a few. We can't even till our gardens until the end of May, we plant in mid-June, and start to harvest in August. A veggie challenge in late summer or fall would make tons more sense to me. I live in northern Quebec, and we're getting veggies and fruit from California and Florida for goodness sakes!

Life, the unive...

RevolutionPlease wrote:

Boom Boom wrote:

I wish it was a vegetarian challenge instead. I don't personally know anyone interested in going vegan (probably they have no idea what "vegan" means), but I have lots of vegetarian friends, and I go mostly vegetarian every summer for almost three months once the garden stuff ripens.

 

Same here Boom Boom.  I'm interested in changing my diet.  This rabble challenge in Canada would be much more successful in the fall. 

 

Let's throw the shoe on the other foot.  In Canada, in the winter,  wouldn't the environment benefit from us hunting our food locally as no local produce is available, while ethically, locally harvested meat is?  I'm not about to go buy vegetables imported from around the world in April.  It does seem like a false start initiative.

 

This is really an interesting subject and I've learned tonnes already reading these threads.

 

Thanks for the discussion.

 

Just so we're clear.  While I think that would be an interesting challenge.  The funny brown things in my field are neither moose nor deer Wink

6079_Smith_W

Unless there are some people here who live on an all-meat diet and nothing else, I think most of us are buying that rice, corn, and fresh vegetables already - meat eaters included. 

Days when I cook vegan (usually a couple of times a week - more if I include vegetarian) don't involve me importing an extra crate of california lettuce to make up for the fish fllet that I am going without.

 

Life, the unive...

6079_Smith_W wrote:

Life, the universe, everything wrote:

I didn't say I owned anything.  You asked me what business it was of mine. 

So yet again what I said is that the campaign is based on untruths and that makes it a problem.  Want to deal with that, or does it make you feel better to attack me?

No attack at all. I'm just delaing with a misconception.

This is an open forum, and the fact that you might have given financial support doesn't give you any more sway than anyone else. There are plenty of things on here that I disagree with, but I usually don't make a big deal about it.

As for the issue itself, I don't care what you might think about some peoples' reasons for promoting vegan week; it is perfectly valid for any number of reasons, including that someone might just want to do it because he or she feels like it. I'm surprised that (like so many issues) it is being judged relative to other things instead of based on its own merit. 

So I don't own the forum, but you are free to tell me whether or not I am allowed to express an opinion that might disagree with you.  I have only been talking about its merit, or in my case lack thereof, yet you continue to attack me personally.

RevolutionPlease RevolutionPlease's picture

I freeze a lot of freshwater fish I catch in the summer to supplement my winter diet.  Asparagus will be coming soon and I can freeze some of that.  I'm not a big fan of venison but my Dad always has some.  I try it here and there but don't like it.  Rabbit is okay but I prefer pheasant.

 

Do folks have tips for canning or freezing the vegetables I actually harvest on my own?

 

This initiative is useless until we adopt tips of Canadian usages for it.

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

Son of a gun. I just looked at the expensive tomatoes I got today - they're certified organic, and are from Saguenay, Quebec. How does the Saguenay grow tomatoes in the winter???  (the brand name is sagami)

RevolutionPlease RevolutionPlease's picture

6079_Smith_W wrote:

Unless there are some people here who live on an all-meat diet and nothing else, I think most of us are buying that rice, corn, and fresh vegetables already - meat eaters included. 

Days when I cook vegan (usually a couple of times a week - more if I include vegetarian) don't involve me importing an extra crate of california lettuce to make up for the fish fllet that I am going without.

 

 

What are you eating then, locally?  I'm a big potato guy.  Yep. I'm Irish.  Spuds are really good for you and take you a long way.

 

To survive veggie and keep my energy up would cost a hell of a lot.

 

I'm not rich.  What suggest you, I do?

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

Folks here salt fresh caught cod not just because they take up a lot of freezer space, but also because salt cod tastes better. There's a guy here who grows cabbage, and he salts it, and it sells out within days. Salted cabbage? That's a new one on me. (salted products have to be rinsed in water - twice - before using).

Life, the unive...

Hydroponics probably Boom Boom or hanging pots in a greenhouse.

RP Freezing is easy for most vegetables -blanch lightly - spread out on a cookie sheet.  Once frozen take off individually and bag or place in thickish plastic containers.   Rather than throwing out extra cob on the corn - cut down the cob, freeze as above and bag.  Very easy.

A neat trick for canning tomatoes is to /just cut them, stuff in a jar, then add some spicing to your taste and then process in a canner.  Will keep you in great tasting tomatoes all winter (unless you want a slice)

Lots of good resources on the net and your local library for canning temps and times.

We hardly buy anything that can't be sourced locally besides tea, sugar and a small number of other items.

 

6079_Smith_W

@ LTU

I said nothing about your freedom to say whatever you want. I was pointing out things on which I think you are mistaken.

@ RP

I have always been partial to canning -vegetables and meat - rather than freezing. The texture and taste are far superior and it keeps a lot longer (and without electricity).

And there is a lot more that you can get through the winter - roots and squash - if you have cold storage and cold frames. I am sure there are forums on it - I went and found a few good government manuals and books on it with times and pressures I could trust. 

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

I'm looking into getting a food dehydrator or whatever it's called - I've been buying dried fruit and tomatoes at a store in Sept-Iles, and I love the stuff. I'm going to try and dry out my own garden veggies this year, for use later in soups and stews.

 

Does anyone here have experience with a food dehydrator?

al-Qa'bong

Quote:

I didn't miss anything, it was clearly as hyperbolic as the jokes you and I both objected too.

 

I can agree to disagree but I found it not helpful.  You're just dancing around your words and not taking ownership.

 

You were the one complaining about those jokes; I just said I heard them before.

 

Whateverthehell "ownership" means, I said twice already that my comments were about my perceptions of what eating an animal means to me.

 

Do you have anything to contribute to any of these conversations, or are you merely the village scold?

RevolutionPlease RevolutionPlease's picture

Thanks for the responses.  I'll just add that perhaps if these initiatives are to succeed you won't just ask folks to look it up on their own.

 

I have no interest in wasting my time surfing the web endlessly.  Links are useful.  I try to provide them when asked.  This is new to me and I would appreciate some help.  Sorry to be short.

 

I don't know where to look but I am interested.  I try to grow more of my own vegetables every year.  I haven't learned how to store them yet.  I throw out a lot of rotten things that I don't know how to store.  (tomatoes, cucumbers are usuaully too abundant, I need to learn to share better, but it's hard folks)  We all ain't perfect.

 

I think a better initiative would be to have neighbourhoods get together and organize meals.

 

COMMUNITY!

 

#winning

6079_Smith_W

RP (read your second post)

On the general question, I think most people DO buy veggies in the winter. dietary challenge or not. I do know that most of us don't have rice paddies in our back yards so there is a fair bit that we must import in the winter. I think the question is to do that wisely and in moderation, and not expect to have fresh peaches in January.

As for me, I still have a few of our potatoes and squash downstairs (and we do have local market sources for roots, onions and cabbage). We also have canned greens (chard and spinach) and apples year-round. A lot of our grains and pulses are in fact local. I think 70 percent of the world's lentils are grown in Saskatchewan, as a matter of fact. So as for replacing protein, there should be no problem there.

Food dehydrators - I have always used an oven with the door open, or better still the sun - which is far better for doing tomatoes. For fish I use salt.

The one thing I fins a drag is that there is no good way to preserve brassicas other than salting or pickling. Can't freeze them, dry them or can them.

RevolutionPlease RevolutionPlease's picture

6079_Smith_W wrote:

Unless there are some people here who live on an all-meat diet and nothing else, I think most of us are buying that rice, corn, and fresh vegetables already - meat eaters included. 

Days when I cook vegan (usually a couple of times a week - more if I include vegetarian) don't involve me importing an extra crate of california lettuce to make up for the fish fllet that I am going without.

 

 

What are you eating then, locally?  I'm a big potato guy.  Yep. I'm Irish.  Spuds are really good for you and take you a long way.

 

To survive veggie and keep my energy up would cost a hell of a lot.

 

I'm not rich.  What suggest you, I do?

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

6079_Smith_W wrote:
Food dehydrators - I have always used an oven with the door open, or better still the sun - which is far better for doing tomatoes. For fish I use salt.

Thanks! (we don't get much in the way of warm sunlight, though - never goes over 78F here)

RevolutionPlease RevolutionPlease's picture

This was an example of a post that I posted before the other one.

 

#babblefail

RevolutionPlease RevolutionPlease's picture

al-Qa'bong wrote:

Quote:

I didn't miss anything, it was clearly as hyperbolic as the jokes you and I both objected too.

 

I can agree to disagree but I found it not helpful.  You're just dancing around your words and not taking ownership.

 

You were the one complaining about those jokes; I just said I heard them before.

 

Whateverthehell "ownership" means, I said twice already that my comments were about my perceptions of what eating an animal means to me.

 

Do you have anything to contribute to any of these conversations, or are you merely the village scold?

 

Just interjecting, my friend, to what I felt was pointless to the discussion.  Feel free to be as you were.  I don't squeak for oil too often.

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

RevolutionPlease wrote:
I think a better initiative would be to have neighbourhoods get together and organize meals.

Here on the coast of Quebec community shared gardens (initiated by the social workers) are quite popular - especially with the senior population. Here in Kegaska which has a tiny population, most seniors have their own veggie garden, and a few of us (including me) have at least a small greenhouse.

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