The Internet

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The Internet

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Quote:
Last week, Bell, Shaw, Quebecor, Rogers, Netflix, the Canadian Media Production Association, Open Media and hundreds of others filed documents detailing the stance they will take at crucial CRTC hearings on vertical integration and Usage-Based Billing in June and July. 

At stake is control over a set of industries – what I call the ‘network media industries’ – that have grown immensely from $42.3-billion in revenue to nearly $74-billion between 1996 and 2009 (adjusted for inflation). Also at stake is whether the ‘business models’ of the dominant telecom and media giants or the open and decentralized principles of the Internet and digital media will set the course of development in the decades ahead. See:Canada in the minority on vertical integration, UBB

See:Latest Columns

See Also: Dwayne winseck

genXer genXer's picture

Can anyone post a link of ISP's that won't implement the cap on internet usage?

Spectrum Spectrum's picture

 

Did some looking .....hard to find specific information your requesting. Maybe some body else knows?

Canadian Nationwide ISPs You'd have to do the research yourself. It would certainly be an interesting question detailed in a list to see.

Spectrum Spectrum's picture

Here is of course is a Global perspective about cost.


Bell Canada took a step back from its aggressive and much-derided stance on usage-based billing (UBB) recently when it announced it would drop efforts to impose an exorbitantly priced UBB model on independent Internet service providers (IISPs) such as TekSavvy Solutions Inc.

Instead, purportedly acceding to IISPs’ requests, it would supply bandwidth to IISPs through an aggregated volume pricing (AVP) model, allowing IISPs to allocate bandwidth as they wished among their customers. Bell would still price bandwidth based on usage; the cost would be 19.5¢ per gigabyte when purchased in a package of one terabyte (1,000 GB), and 29.5¢ per GB for any overage.

On the surface this appears to be a generous concession by Bell, an improvement on a severely restrictive supply model and otherworldly pricing far beyond that seen anywhere else in the industrialized world (its previous UBB plan sought up to $2.50/GB).

See: Internet Billing Debate: Too little, too late by Rocky Gaudrault

***

Comment by Bill Hillier:

The poor state of all Telecom Services AND its high prices was spurred by the Conservative governments 2006 policy direction. The major telecoms have been in a profitering feeding frenzy ever since. While prices in the rest of the world or telecom services have been dropping, The prices in Canada have only increased.


It is time for Canadians to stand together and put a stop to this!


What TRUE competition and "Market Forces" brings to the consumer.


UK, Orange, 20Mbps , Unlimited, $23.48 CAD.
France, Orange, 8Mbps, Unlimited, 28.42 CAD.
France, SFR, 20Mbps, Unlimited, 21.68 CAD.
Romania, Adnet telecom, 10Mbps, Unlimited, 29.13 CAD.
Italy, Libero, 7 MMbps, unlimited, 26.99 CAD.
Japan, OCN, 12Mbs, Unlimited, 25.22 CAD.
Russia, AKADO-Stolitsa JSC), 20Mbps, Unlimited, 25.00 CAD.
Netherlands, Online, 4Mbps, Unlimited, $24,04 CAD.
Netherlands, Online, 20Mbps, Unlimited, $30.88 CAD.
Netherlands, KPN, 8Mbps, Unlimited, $34.33 CAD.
Netherlands, XS4ALL, 8Mbps, Unlimited, $41.13 CAD.
Romania 50 Mbps, Unlimited, $9.56 100 Mbps, Unlimited, $12.86 (incl. VAT) CAD

Spectrum Spectrum's picture

Who Ever Controls The Medium......Controls the Message

 

Now look at the principals behind "usage based billing" and "the pipeline" that is used. How to you reconcile unlimited caps with ISP's using the same pipe line? Look above at Globally. The policy direction in 2006. Why even comment during an election debate when you know what their policy is going to be and that people will not be happy. It may have swayed their vote. So better not to say anything eh?

 

The UBB deception

The Digital Debate

To watch the original full-length version go to the CBC: http://www.cbc.ca/video/#/News/Canada_Votes_2011/1857462143/ID=1871321854

Why sign onto packages that Limit your data? Why check youself into how much data you are using? Leave your internet on all the time?(conserve?)How do we limit our expenses as consumers is how we are already accustomed to the way they are showing it to us?

What method then has been introduce psychologically to push you into new modes of thinking, that are capitalistic by intent?

Reject those modesl which are directing you to assume what it is desired by controlling your thinking? Controlling the medium?

Quote:
Also at stake is whether the ‘business models’ of the dominant telecom and media giants or the open and decentralized principles of the Internet and digital media will set the course of development in the decades ahead.Canada in the minority on vertical integration, UBB

Spectrum Spectrum's picture

So what do you do? Tell me.

 

Imagine "metering" the rays of the sun while you pay for solar cells to produce energy? Do you have any comparisons likewise? Is this logical in comparison?

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To whom it may concern:

The early Internet was so accidental, it also was free and open in this sense. The Internet has become as important as anything man has ever created. But those freedoms are being chipped away. Please, I beg you, open your senses to the will of the people to keep the Internet as free as possible. Local ISP's should provide connection to the Internet but then it should be treated as though you own those wires and can choose what to do with them when and how you want to, as long as you don't destruct them. I don't want to feel that whichever content supplier had the best government connections or paid the most money determined what I can watch and for how much. This is the monopolistic approach and not representative of a truly free market in the case of today's Internet.Steve Wozniak to the FCC: Keep the Internet Free

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In a time and space.....

Anonymous said... wrote:
Thoughts of Herbert Marshall McLuhan come to mind.

On a slight revise version then of the "Medium is the Message."

Own the Medium then you own the message.

The point is then such a convergence of broadcasting telephony and internet, become a way for large corporation to transform the population as they are now by our acceptance of data trains and speeds, that we have to undo the damage already done by the conglomerates on the psychology of the people.

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Technological Determinism

Media determinism, a subset of technological determinism, is a philosophical and sociological position which posits the power of the media to impact society. [69]

McLuhan explains technological determinism as it relates to media.

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"the printing press, the computer, and television are not therefore simply machines which convey information. They are metaphors through which we conceptualize reality in one way or another. They will classify the world for us, sequence it, frame it, enlarge it, reduce it, argue a case for what it is like. Through these media metaphors, we do not see the world as it is. We see it as our coding systems are. Such is the power of the form of information." [70]

Spectrum Spectrum's picture

I am glad the PC's came out in support of the CBC......felt really disappointed when they allowed Bell to take over the CTV. Clements did force telecoms to project local television channels.....but we still have a long way to go when it comes to the internet.

Tommy_Paine

I would expect Clements to flip flop any day now-- assuming he is invited back to cabinet, and assuming he has the same post.

Spectrum Spectrum's picture

Hi Tommy

My fear too I think, especially if one can place in mind that a majority can also represent a monarchy?:)

TED talk by Eli Pariser

You always have to be aware of the "hidden reality" that has come about with the internet "being owned."

Spectrum Spectrum's picture

How do you identify the Gate Keepers?

 

The Lawful Access Legislation: Does it Really Criminalize Linking & Anonymity?
by Michael Geist

Quote:

Wednesday May 11, 2011

The government's plans to include lawful access provisions within its omnibus crime bill has attracted mounting attention in recent days as many commentators express concern that the legislation could create criminal liability for linking to content that incites hatred and for using anonymous or false names online. The concerns started at the Free Dominion site and have since spread to Brian Lilley at the Toronto Sun and Jesse Brown's blog at Maclean's


As I have argued for a long time, there are many reasons to be concerned with lawful access. The government has never provided adequate evidence on the need for it, it has never been subject to committee review, it would mandate disclosure of some personal information without court oversight, it would establish a massive ISP regulatory process (including employee background checks), it would install broad new surveillance technologies, and it would cost millions (without a sense of who actually pays). Given these problems, it is not surprising to find that every privacy commissioner in Canada has signed a joint letter expressing their concerns.

So ask your self, what happens to the alias's that Babble has incorporated since the beginning days of Babble? Will it continue to exist in it's forum style today?

As a Union, will security over ride the rights and freedoms of non profit organization to link each other so that they may combine their messages for a democracy  at work?

Spectrum Spectrum's picture

 

Canadian government plans to outlaw internet linking
Bill C-51: Investigative Powers for the 21st Century Act

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If development can take place as a copyleft agenda  of hardware to access to the internet then this would fly in face of big telecom and government,  depending on access to spectrum license as a municipal endeavor?

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Preliminary test

The Federal Communications Commission's Office of Engineering and Technology released a report dated July 31, 2007 with results from its investigation of two preliminary devices submitted. The report concluded that the devices did not reliably sense the presence of television transmissions or other incumbent users, hence are not acceptable for use in their current state and no further testing was deemed necessary.[12]

However, on August 13, 2007 Microsoft filed a document with the FCC in which it described a meeting that its engineers had with FCC engineers from the Office of Engineering and Technology on August 9 and 10. At this meeting the Microsoft engineers showed results from their testing done with identical prototype devices and using identical testing methods that "detected DTV signals at a threshold of -114 dBm in laboratory bench testing with 100 percent accuracy, performing exactly as expected." In the presence of FCC engineers, the Microsoft engineers took apart the device that the FCC had tested to find the cause of the poor performance. They found that "the scanner in the device had been damaged and operated at a severely degraded level" which explained the FCC unit's inability to detect when channels were occupied. It was also pointed out that the FCC was in possession of an identical backup prototype that was in perfect operating condition that they had not tested.[13]

[edit] FCC decision

TV broadcasters and other incumbent users of this spectrum (both licensed and unlicensed, including makers of wireless audio systems) feared that their systems would no longer function properly if unlicensed devices were to operate in the same spectrum. However, the FCC's Office of Engineering and Technology released a report dated October 15, 2008, which evaluated prototype TV-band white spaces devices submitted by Adaptrum, The Institute for Infocomm Research, Motorola and Philips. The report concluded that these devices had met the burden of "proof of concept" in their ability to detect and avoid legacy transmissions,[14] although none of the tested devices adequately detected wireless microphone signals in the presence of a digital TV transmitter on an adjacent channel.

On November 4, 2008, the FCC voted 5-0 to approve the unlicensed use of white space,[15] thereby silencing opposition from broadcasters. The actual Second Report and Order was released ten days later and contains some serious obstacles for the development and use of TV Band Devices as they are called by FCC. Devices must both consult an FCC-mandated database to determine which channels are available for use at a given location, and must also monitor the spectrum locally once every minute to confirm that no legacy wireless microphones, video assist devices or other emitters are present. If a single transmission is detected, the device may not transmit anywhere within the entire 6 MHz channel in which the transmission was received.[16] It is hoped that, within a year, this new access will lead to more reliable WiFi and other technologies.

On September 23, 2010 the FCC released a Memorandum Opinion and Order that determined the final rules for the use of white space for unlicensed wireless devices.[17] The new rules removed mandatory sensing requirements which greatly facilitates the use of the spectrum with geolocation based channel allocation. The final rules adopt a proposal from the White Spaces Coalition[18] for very strict emission rules that prevent the direct use of IEEE 802.11 (Wi-Fi) in a single channel effectively making the new spectrum unusable for Wi-Fi technologies.

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Quote:

Unlicensed Spectrum

Unlicensed spectrum is not sold to the highest bidder and used for the services chosen by the license-holder but is instead accessible to anyone using wireless equipment certified by the FCC for those frequencies. Among the advantages of unlicensed spectrum is the opportunity to test new technology directly with consumers instead of going through spectrum license-holders. One of the disadvantages of unlicensed spectrum is the possibility of interference among the transmissions of the various users, both within the assigned bandwidth and with other bandwidths. Currently, there are no commercial applications for WiMAX using unlicensed spectrum. The cost of developing WiMAX applications for unlicensed use could impact its adaptation by municipalities seeking to provide wireless broadband services.

 

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Tue, Jan 20, 2009 at 10:19 AM Richard Stallman Response

No.  Send me a writeup if yo wish.

  

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I write this  now for consideration and then ask, you if there is such
   a thing as to design the hardware under "this idea of yours" to
   advance the internet as a free access, instead of the piggy back that
   we can do from libraries and such.

The main useful step here, I think, is to set up free municipal
wireless networks.  This has no real overlap with what I do, and I
don't have time to get involved in it myself, but I am willing to say
publicly that it is a good thing.

Spectrum Spectrum's picture

White Owl

 

Quote:
In the decision the CRTC ruled that rural and remote broadband access should be left to market forces and targeted government funding with private-public partnerships.

Not necessarily the right one in my opinion. But I have a plan, and within the United States there are those who have already paved the way.  I'll give that information soon, as to get some idea of how Community Broadband systems can be developed with the  help of municipalities without Government and  big business.

http://vimeo.com/23438041

Broadband and Community Access in Canada: A Canoe Trip Up North, Featuring a Veritable Cast of Characters.... from Leslie Shade on Vimeo.

Quote:
Concordia University Media Studies MA students in Professor Leslie Shade’s Fall 2010 Media Policy course considered the issue of whether broadband access should be considered a basic service for all Canadians. They created a video-podcast exploring the issues, in light of the CRTC hearing hearings for 2010-43, "Obligation to serve and other matters" that took place in the Fall.

On May 3, 2011 the CRTC issued its decision on the matter of Telecom Regulatory Policy CRTC 2011-291. In the decision the CRTC ruled that rural and remote broadband access should be left to market forces and targeted government funding with private-public partnerships. The ruling also stated that broadband access will not be a requisite of any basic service objective. In the decision the CRTC established target speeds of 5 megabits per second (Mbps) downstream and 1 Mbps upstream, for all Canadians, by the end of 2015.

Roddy Doucet, a student in the class, commented, “With the decision to allow incumbents the right to charge higher rates for rural telephone lines and its continued reliance on market forces to achieve accessibility goals the CRTC demonstrates its lack of vision for a national broadband network that works to reduce boundaries and unify Canadians.

Our class research demonstrates that access to broadband, at fair and affordable prices, allows unique regionally-based small businesses to flourish, improves quality of life, and allows education and research to flow freely around the country and the world. Canadians look to our regulatory agencies to protect them against price-gouging and also shape the future of our communications networks and sadly the CRTC is failing us.”

The discourse over the state of Canada’s broadband infrastructure illustrates the contentious debates between industry, government, the CRTC and public interest groups over whether and if regulatory intervention can increase competition in the broadband sector. Dominant industry groups contend that too much regulation will merely stifle competition by restricting their ability to innovate and invest in established and emerging markets. Public interest groups argue that only government intervention, whether through a pro-active regulatory environment that requires incumbents to contribute to building out broadband in under-served and remote areas and/or a more fulsome funding structure for community broadband initiatives, can ensure and sustain wider broadband access for Canadians.

References

CRTC 2010-43:
crtc.gc.ca/​eng/​process/​2010/​oct26_ag.htm

CRTC, Telecom Regulatory Policy CRTC 2011-291:
crtc.gc.ca/​eng/​archive/​2011/​2011-291.pdf

Spectrum Spectrum's picture

Breaking the Broadband Monopoly

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Communities that have invested in these networks have seen tremendous benefits. Even small communities have generated millions of dollars in cumulative savings from reduced rates – caused by competition. Major employers have cited broadband networks as a deciding factor in choosing a new site and existing businesses have prospered in a more competitive environment.

Residents who subscribe to the network see the benefits of a network that puts service first; they talk to a neighbor when something goes wrong, not an offshore call center. At the municipal fiber network in Wilson, North Carolina, they talk of the “strangle effect.” If you have problems with their network, you can find someone locally to strangle. Because public entities are directly accountable to citizens, they have a stronger interest in providing good services, upgrading infrastructure, etc., than private companies who are structured to maximize profits, not community benefits. Residents who remain with private providers still get the benefits of competition, including reduced rates and increased incumbent investment.

Some publicly owned networks have decided to greatly increase competition by adopting an “open access” approach where independent service providers can use the network on equal terms. Public ownership and open access give residents and businesses the option of choosing among many providers, forcing providers to compete on the basis of service quality and price rather than simply on a historic monopoly boundary.Published May 2010 Author: Christopher Mitchell

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http://youtu.be/QqwjjfKRgb0

Quote:

Google Fiber for Communities: Get Involved

Thank you to all of the communities and individuals that expressed their interest in Google Fiber for Communities. The quality and scope of the responses exceeded our expectations, and we were honored by the thought and effort that went into every submission. One message came through loud and clear: people across the country are hungry for better and faster broadband access.

 

Spectrum Spectrum's picture

So here's the plan.

A shift from big Telecom to Community Broadband communications.

The CRTC made it's decision.....but we can change that. Municipal television networks? Do we need the integration of big Telecom or can local TV stations newly formed become part of the expression on a international stage by supplying local community news? Local newspapers,  part of the expression of those communities? Access to the internet,  not dictated by cost of usage based billing of Big Telecom that has a monopoly?

Why no development of rural/municipalities communities since wireless already exists? Faster speeds as fiber optic laid in rural/municipalities communities?

Municipal Broadband: Demystifying Wireless and Fiber-Optic Options

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The United States, creator of the Internet, increasingly lags in access to it. In the absence of a national broadband strategy, many communities have invested in broadband infrastructure, especially wireless broadband, to offer broadband choices to their residents.

Newspaper headlines trumpeting the death of municipal wireless networks ignore the increasing investments by cities in Wi-Fi systems. At the same time, the wireless focus by others diverts resources and action away from building the necessary long term foundation for high speed information: fiber optic networks.

DSL and cable networks cannot offer the speeds required by a city wishing to compete in the digital economy. Business, government, and citizens all need affordable and fast access to information networks.

Today's decisions will lay the foundation of telecommunications infrastructure for decades. Fortunately, we already know the solution: wireless solves the mobility problem; fiber solves the speed and capacity problems; and public ownership offers a network built to benefit the community.Published January 2008 Author: Christopher Mitchell

Fidel

It seems as Canadians become more connected and better informed, the more we vote NDP.

Spectrum Spectrum's picture

Fidel wrote:

It seems as Canadians become more connected and better informed, the more we vote NDP.

How much was the NDP willing to spend from the auction of frequencies  to connect and invest in rural Canada by the millions more then what the progressives thought would be enough. knowing the policies the progressives had adopted by reference to the CRTC decision in May of 2010,  as articulated from the class of the good professor on media up a couple of posts.

It's true Fidel, not just with anyone political party but an understanding of the policies each represents. The internet allows us to look at this a little deeper then some staunch,  I am such and such, without this in-depth analysis of the party representations. Yes something is ringing true to those seeking change in society, not knowing how this comes about.

Quote:
McLuhan understood "medium" in a broad sense. He identified the light bulb as a clear demonstration of the concept of “the medium is the message”. A light bulb does not have content in the way that a newspaper has articles or a television has programs, yet it is a medium that has a social effect; that is, a light bulb enables people to create spaces during nighttime that would otherwise be enveloped by darkness. He describes the light bulb as a medium without any content. McLuhan states that "a light bulb creates an environment by its mere presence."[2]

Monopolies own as in big telecom has this affect considering that they indeed carry ownership of the medium they also own the message of McLuhan's pre-understanding of the future of mediums portraying the messages. How biased that the message could have snuck up on people to know that they will only see the barrage of what Telecoms want you to see, is now how we see? Apathy and complacency are the signs of the times when no body cares and life is lead by what others spell out for you.

It is better we have some differentiating, methodicalness to developing points of view other then what we are being told.

While I push forward here on the internet I am wondering how people feel about all this wireless being sent "through our heads?"

Fidel

Spectrum wrote:
It is better we have some differentiating, methodicalness to developing points of view other then what we are being told.

I get the impression that internet technology is causing people to think more and encourage people to read who otherwise would not. Some day internet capacity will be built to accomodate the future, like voice and video coms as the norm instead of text-based presentations as they are now. The demand for video and voice over multimedia data protocols is with us already. People are hungry for more information always. I think someone told me that most people are visual and then auditory learners. Reading text printed on parchments of dead trees was fun in the 1950s, but people want more stimulation today. Ralph Nader said: "Information is the currency of democracy". And we need more democracy. 

No Internet in 1/5th of Canadian Homes

Spectrum wrote:
While I push forward here on the internet I am wondering how people feel about all this wireless being sent "through our heads?"

Wireless infrastructure is cheaper than doing it properly. Fiber optic will probably always be a faster medium of transmission. How can over the air compete with speed of light? It's all about money and them trying to convince us that rich corporate friends of the party can do it cheaper and better. It's not true, but people will tend to believe the first thing they hear or read anyway.

Spectrum Spectrum's picture

Hi Fidel,

Little did I know of what was happening in the background of Steve Andersen's report while I was looking to an Public Broadband system.

Quote:
The Internet’s open architecture has become central to the success of our economy, our culture, and our society. Casting An Open Net is the first comprehensive report that establishes the need for the principle of openness to guide digital policy in Canada. The report lays out a well-researched plan for an open and affordable Internet—an action plan for a connected Canada. Casting An Open Net

Fidel wrote:
People are hungry for more information always. I think someone told me that most people are visual and then auditory learners.

I supported OpenMedia because I think the connections are important for our society, and as you pointed out it is the push to an auditory and visual connection that Telecom is very aware as well, that the integration becomes very evident as a push into a marketing direction that few of us would have understood had we not been part of the growth of the internet.

Quote:

Google

Finally, I want to applaud and thank FCC Chairman Kevin Martin, the other commissioners, and the FCC Office of Engineering and Technology for their leadership in advancing this important issue. And, thanks to the more than 20,000 of you who took a stand on this issue through our Free the Airwaves campaign, the FCC heard a clear message from consumers: these airwaves can bring wireless Internet to everyone everywhere.A vote for broadband in the "white spaces"Posted by Larry Page, Co-Founder and President of Products Wednesday, November 5, 2008

But for me to create competition against a monopoly is not to cater to big Telecom..but to keep then in line with the realization that consumerism has a choice in terms of a public broadcasting system that choice is still a viable opportunity. The fight between Microsoft and the choice as to platforms is just as important here as it is with what Government is now saying about Canadians and the current Telecoms systems in place.

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BC Books Online

BC Books Online is collaboration between publishers and libraries to purchase electronic rights to a collection of non-fiction books by BC publishers and to make them accessible through public, school, and post-secondary libraries. It is the first time ever that publishers and libraries have come together with the objective to deliver digital content to an entire province.

 

***

Books thrown in the air

See:Your Book's Never out at This Library

Schooling and the changes in the future are something that is being considered now as to the way education is being delivered. While living in rural communities the Liberal government thought to streamline it's schools by school boards cutting costs,  so they shut down schools. Teachers lost jobs. The need is still there to teach children in these communities. Busing issues are now the burden of the school districts while they try to push this back onto people in those communities.

Keep the schools and keep communities alive by communities building the infrastructure Public Broadband system to keep rural Canada alive and connected with the rest of the world. Government is not so concern with this aspect of the new Future, better to leave in the hands of Big Business.

Moving away from outsourcing call centers raises more a concern with how labour has been bought cheaply by moving these services to other countries. Nothing pisses me off more then to hear from somebody across the ocean tryng to tell me about community and how things work.

You understand the Government's platform?;)

Well if I call my local municipality with concerns about my connection don't you think creating jobs back here at home we might raised the understanding that job creation can be re instituted by creating union jobs for people who had been loosing them to technology business developments that Governments thought were the right way to go?


Rural Library Community Model

We still need those teachers in the community settings to monitor and watch students as they have access to the curriculum of a public school system. The push is to offload this burden to private school systems just as health care is being offloaded to "for profit business model" as a choice to healthcare.

Spectrum Spectrum's picture

Thanks Fidel,

Fidel wrote:
Wireless infrastructure is cheaper than doing it properly.

I am not sure about cheaply for who? $3.00 a megabite out of your pocket outside of the plan? Whose the crimminal here?

Quote:
(CBC) --- About a fifth of Canadian households, many among the poorest in the country, still had no internet access in 2010, a survey suggests.

Forty-six per cent of households falling in the lowest income quarter -- those earning $30,000 or less -- had no internet access, according to Statistics Canada's 2010 Internet Use Survey, released Wednesday.

But in the highest income quarter -- made up of households earning $87,000 or more -- only three per cent lacked internet access, the survey indicates.Canadians Online: No Internet In 1/5th Of Canadian Homes

As I have stated before the biggest crime right now is having to search for ways in which people of rural communities have been looking to attain a good speed and connection to the internet when big business already knew that they could have been connected by wireless. Why should rural Canada be penalized? There was a way and they thought it better not to say anything?

Ya trust Big Business and trust your Government to do the right thing?:)

Spectrum Spectrum's picture

Quote:

The History Conclusion and
Future Forecast...

The Net is a unique creation of human intelligence.

...  the first intelligent artificial organism.

...  represents the growth of a new society within the old.

...  represents a new model of governance.

...  represents a threat to civil liberties.

...  the greatest free marketplace of ideas that has ever existed.

The Net is in imminent danger of extinction.

The Net is immortal.

Quote:

McLuhan explains technological determinism as it relates to media.

"the printing press, the computer, and television are not therefore simply machines which convey information. They are metaphors through which we conceptualize reality in one way or another. They will classify the world for us, sequence it, frame it, enlarge it, reduce it, argue a case for what it is like. Through these media metaphors, we do not see the world as it is. We see it as our coding systems are. Such is the power of the form of information." [70]

Just going back in time to our internet roots with regard to medium of expression, is to see someone with vision of our future which can be attained only when it has come to past? Auditory and visual integration as a sign of what integration takes place in the usage of, by the UBB? Yes Fidel in a way McLuhan was a visionary of a kind.

Quote:

Partial map of the Internet based on the January 15, 2005 data found on opte.org. Each line is drawn between two nodes, representing two IP addresses. The length of the lines are indicative of the delay between those two nodes. This graph represents less than 30% of the Class C networks reachable by the data collection program in early 2005. Lines are color-coded according to their corresponding RFC 1918 allocation as follows:

  • Dark blue: net, ca, us
  • Green: com, org
  • Red: mil, gov, edu
  • Yellow: jp, cn, tw, au, de
  • Magenta: uk, it, pl, fr
  • Gold: br, kr, nl
  • White: unknown

So it is about our future then and what we want from society. The way society will grow?

Quote:

See:Creating a Science of the Web

The Web is the largest human information construct in history. The Web is transforming society. In order to...understand what the Web is engineer its future ensure its social benefit

...we need a new interdisciplinary field that we call Web Science.

The Web Science Research Initiative brings together academics, scientists, sociologists, entrepreneurs and decision makers from around the world. These people will create the first multidisciplinary research body to examine the World Wide Web and offer the practical solutions needed to help guide its future use and design.

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Quote:

Web Science - helping ensure the healthy development of the future Web

Web Science is one of the main opportunities for ensuring the healthy development of the future Web, according to Sir Tim Berners-Lee, keynote speaker at the conference ‘Profiting from the New Web’, held in London this week.

An audience drawn largely from the technology sector heard Sir Tim outline his hopes for the Web’s future, along with some warnings about potential limitations to the development of the Web.

His keynote set the scene for a full day of discussion about new ways of doing business that have been enabled by the Web and will make a significant difference to business practice in the future.

Sir Tim, creator of the World Wide Web, pointed to open data and linked data as exciting examples of the way that the Web is promoting transparency of information and looked forward to the time when the current 20 per cent of the world’s population who can access the Web grows to 80 per cent, with all the changes this will bring in terms of technological and social developments, and new possibilities of communication and cultural change.

“Maybe our ideas of democracies will be different,” he said. “Maybe people will build systems that we can use to communicate across boundaries … or maybe we won’t …. Whatever happens at this stage we have to think about it - and what we think about it we call Web Science.”

http://webscience.org/article/163.html

Quote:

The Web has transformed the way you do business. It has transformed your relationships with stakeholders, their interactions with each other and their regard for your brands. This change was difficult to foresee just a decade or so ago. Imagine now what the New Web promises.

The New Web is here now, and the early adopters have begun to put it to work. The earlier your organisation understands what it is, what’s possible and what’s happening today, the sooner you can pursue the opportunities and secure competitive advantage.

Sir Tim Berners-Lee, inventor of the World Wide Web, and a host of experts bring you up to speed. See: Profiting from the Web

Fidel

Thanks Spectrum. I have studied computer engineering technology for some time and can appreciate your interest and extraordinary knowledge of the subject. IT is huge and expanding into many other areas of science and humanities for sure. Marketing of widgets over the web is certainly one aspect of the trade and commerce end of it. Information will be the most valuable commodity of the future as our oil-based widget economies give way to economies based on ideas and human creativity. And I think democracy could be strengthened by internet technologies. Some day.

Santiago Dreaming: History of the first socialist internet

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Wireless community network
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Setting up a Wi-Fi connection

Wireless community networks or wireless community projects are the organizations that attempt to take a grassroots approach to providing a viable alternative to municipal wireless networks for consumers.

Because of evolving technology and locales, there are at least four different types of solution:

  • Cluster: Advocacy groups which simply encourage sharing of unmetered internet bandwidth via Wi-Fi, may also index nodes, suggest uniform SSID (for low-quality roaming), supply equipment, dns services, etc.
  • Mesh: Technology groups which coordinate building a mesh network to provide Wi-Fi access to the internet
  • WISP: A mesh that forwards all traffic back to consolidated link aggregation point(s) that have centralized access to the internet
  • WUG: A wireless user group run by wireless enthusiasts. An open network not used for the reselling of internet. Running a combination of various off the shelf WIFI hardware running in the license free ISM bands 2.4 GHz/5.8 GHz

Certain countries regulate the selling of internet access, requiring a license to sell internet access over a wireless network. In South Africa it is regulated by ICASA[1][2] They require that WISP's apply for a VANS or ECNS/ECS license before being allowed to resell internet access over a wireless link.

The cluster and mesh approaches are more common but rely primarily on the sharing of unmetered residential and business DSL and cable Internet. This sort of usage might be non-compliant with the Terms of Service (ToS) of the typical local providers that deliver their service via the consumer phone and cable duopoly. Wireless community network sometimes advocate complete freedom from censorship, and this position may be at odds with the Acceptable Use Policies of some commercial services used. Some ISPs do allow sharing or reselling of bandwidth.[3]

Contents

History

These projects are in many senses an evolution of amateur radio, and more specifically packet radio, as well as an outgrowth of the free software community (which in itself substantially overlaps with amateur radio)[citation needed]. The key to using standard wireless networking devices designed for short-range use for multi-kilometre Long Range Wi-Fi linkups is the use of high-gain directional antennas. Rather than purchasing commercially available units, such groups sometimes advocate homebuilt antenna construction. Examples include the cantenna, which is typically constructed from a Pringles potato chip can, and RONJA, an optical link that can be made from a smoke flue and LEDs, with circuitry and instructions released under the GFDL. As with other wireless mesh networks, three distinct generations of mesh networks are used in wireless community networks.[4][5] In particular, in the 2004 timeframe, some mesh projects suffered poor performance when scaled up.[6][7]

[edit] Organization

Organizationally, a wireless community network requires either a set of affordable commercial technical solutions or a critical mass of hobbyists willing to tinker to maintain operations. Mesh networks require that a high level of community participation and commitment be maintained for the network to be viable. The mesh approach currently requires uniform equipment. One market-driven aspect of the mesh approach is that users who receive a weak mesh signal can often convert it to a strong signal by obtaining and operating a repeater node, thus extending the mesh network.

Such volunteer organizations focusing in technology that is rapidly advancing sometimes have schisms and mergers. The Wi-Fi service provided by such groups is usually free and without the stigma of piggybacking (internet access). An alternative to the voluntary model is to use a co-operative structure.[8]

See also


Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Wireless network communities

References

  1. ^ ICASA - The Regulator for the South African Communications Sector
  2. ^ http://www.icasa.org.za/Documents.aspx?Page=134
  3. ^ Wireless-Friendly ISPSs Electronic Frontier Foundation accessed 4 May 2011
  4. ^ Talkin' 'bout my generation November 16, 2006
  5. ^ Free Culture, Free Software, Free Infrastructures!, Interviews with Klohjschi, Jürgen Neumann (Freifunk Germany), Kurt Jansson (Wikimedia Germany), Rishab Aiyer Ghosh (United Nations University), Lawrence Lessig (Creative Commons), Allison, Benoit (Montréal Wireless Community) October 18, 2006
  6. ^ Analysis of Mesh Architectures December 8, 2004
  7. ^ Ugly truth about mesh networks June 28, 2004
  8. ^ Easier said than done: Second thoughts about municipal Wi-Fi May 25th 2007

External links

Spectrum Spectrum's picture

Fidel wrote:

Thanks Spectrum. I have studied computer engineering technology for some time and can appreciate your interest and extraordinary knowledge of the subject. IT is huge and expanding into many other areas of science and humanities for sure. Marketing of widgets over the web is certainly one aspect of the trade and commerce end of it. Information will be the most valuable commodity of the future as our oil-based widget economies give way to economies based on ideas and human creativity. And I think democracy could be strengthened by internet technologies. Some day.

Santiago Dreaming: History of the first socialist internet

It seems this is a topic precursor with Cern? Have to check the dates and see what comes out of it? Also how aware was research there in Chile current with other research going on in other places, like Cern?

Yes sure there was methods and ways in which to setup neworks is as old as time in regards to communciation and the way and means to develop the methods to do so.

Quote:
Stafford Beer, who died last year, was a restless and idealistic British adventurer who had long been drawn to Chile. Part scientist, part management guru, part social and political theorist, he had grown rich but increasingly frustrated in Britain during the 50s and 60s. His ideas about the similarities between biological and man-made systems, most famously expressed in his later book, The Brain of the Firm, made him an in-demand consultant with British businesses and politicians. Yet these clients did not adopt the solutions he recommended as often as he would have liked, so Beer began taking more contracts abroad.Santiago dreaming

In bold I added for emphasis as to indicate how neurological development is like that image up above as to connections made. How vast the network, a question for sure.

Fidel wrote:
Marketing of widgets over the web is certainly one aspect of the trade and commerce end of it.

Google's algorithms for ad sense seems to be triggered in mind here?

Many things to ponder on the emergent feature from complex bits of information. Entanglement and cryptology?

Quote:
Do we selectively ignore other models from artificial intelligence such as Zadeh’s Fuzzy Logic? This is a logic used to model perception and used in newly designed “smart” cameras. Where standard logic must give a true or false value to every proposition, fuzzy logic assigns a certainty value between zero and one to each of the propositions, so that we say a statement is .7 true and .3 false. Is this theory selectively ignored to support our theories?

Using Quantum interrogation it seemed relevant when held in context of Quanglement?

 

Spectrum Spectrum's picture

New Research Reveals How DNA Could Power Computers

-IMAGEALT-

The mystery DNA spippets are about 300 times less likely than other regions of the genome to be lost during the course of mammalian evolution.
CREDIT: Dreamstime

Quote:
Engineers have long dreamed of using DNA as the backbone for the next generation of computer circuits. New research shows just how it might be done.

Instead of conventional circuits built of silicon that use electrical current, computer engineers could take advantage of the unique properties of DNA, the double-helix molecule that carries life’s information.

“Conventional technology has reached its physical limits," said Chris Dwyer, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering at Duke University's Pratt School of Engineering.

See Also: DNA computing

Fidel

Spectrum wrote:
It seems this is a topic precursor with Cern? Have to check the dates and see what comes out of it? Also how aware was research there in Chile current with other research going on in other places, like Cern?
Yes sure there was methods and ways in which to setup neworks is as old as time in regards to communciation and the way and means to develop the methods to do so.

I'm not sure what it has to do with CERN. I believer there are possibilities for quantum and-or computing in general that may emerge as a result of the science produced from CERN. Perhaps the EU will not disintegrate and will become a world centre of high technology with spinoff technologies driving new and modern economies. It's very hopeful.

I believe one of the objectives of the Santiago experiment was to prove that something about socialism is possible and which its free market friendly critics still ask today: How does a socialist economic system provide feedback to central planners concerning demand for goods and services?

Spectrum Spectrum's picture

Fidel wrote:
I'm not sure what it has to do with CERN. I believer there are possibilities for quantum and-or computing in general that may emerge as a result of the science produced from CERN.

Quality researchers as Stafford Beer would have been aware of other work in progress so as to fine tuned their own processes. It was off the cuff, and might not mean anything for sure, it's just something that popped into mind. Mind you,  he might not have been as connected as we are today with research and evidence brought forth.

Cybersyn control room

A "central location" sensitive to the nervous system(control center)? Yes in relation too, "I believe one of the objectives of the Santiago experiment was to prove that something about socialism is possible and which its free market friendly critics still ask today. The biological association is very real and part of the question is  "whether the soul is an active component of the reality of computerized developer as an effective decision making without part of the emotive connection we have as an emphatic quality of being,"  that is ever the strive toward future development of that DNA computerized structure? Memory inducement? Long term "smell" associations? Learning and education?

How is cell phone frequencies affecting the DNA structure? What conclusive proof so that we say greater speeds from fiber optic, while reducing wireless as an affect on sperm? Has a design been implemented as to structure the computer as a architectural structure that is beneficial to humanities goal of society progressing or retrograding with the creation of Frankenstein? Intellectual drones......so many bit constructs, as manufactured by an advanced society? Economically why would anyone have to think economically about it,  so that it can take care of itself?

Quote:

Towards quantum chemistry on a quantum computer

B. P. Lanyon1,2, J. D. Whitfield4, G. G. Gillett1,2, M. E. Goggin1,5, M. P. Almeida1,2, I. Kassal4, J. D. Biamonte4,6, M. Mohseni4,6, B. J. Powell1,3, M. Barbieri1,2,6, A. Aspuru-Guzik4 & A. G. White1,2

Abstract

Exact first-principles calculations of molecular properties are currently intractable because their computational cost grows exponentially with both the number of atoms and basis set size. A solution is to move to a radically different model of computing by building a quantum computer, which is a device that uses quantum systems themselves to store and process data. Here we report the application of the latest photonic quantum computer technology to calculate properties of the smallest molecular system: the hydrogen molecule in a minimal basis. We calculate the complete energy spectrum to 20 bits of precision and discuss how the technique can be expanded to solve large-scale chemical problems that lie beyond the reach of modern supercomputers. These results represent an early practical step toward a powerful tool with a broad range of quantum-chemical applications.


Quantum Chlorophyll as a dissipative messenger toward construction of the "emotive system" as a centralized endocrine association of messengers...to activate the real human values of caring?

Quote:

Photos By: Illustration by Megan Gundrum, fifth-year DAAP student

For decades, farmers have been trying to find ways to get more energy out of the sun.

In natural photosynthesis, plants take in solar energy and carbon dioxide and then convert it to oxygen and sugars. The oxygen is released to the air and the sugars are dispersed throughout the plant — like that sweet corn we look for in the summer. Unfortunately, the allocation of light energy into products we use is not as efficient as we would like. Now engineering researchers at the University of Cincinnati are doing something about that.See:Frogs, Foam and Fuel: UC Researchers Convert Solar Energy to Sugars

Fidel wrote:
How does a socialist economic system provide feedback to central planners concerning demand for goods and services?

As I've grown older and watched society in progress it has been of increasing concerned to me that we have lost something in our caring of the whole system, in face of part of that system. Profit orientation has done that when it has come to what we think should happen in regards to privatization and the loss of public accountability with regard to cost of living. Monopolies, and how we don't recognize them or their affect on the way we live.

I am not well educated, although have watch and been a part of the evolution of the internet as it has come forward in expression so I have learn to use it's language to help display the things I have learn. Just put it out there. So it is important that what is presented is accurate. So the push for educational facilities to open them self up to the general public to cater not only to its students but to allow the populace to access the same information.

The Manhattan Economic question? What is the best and fairest way in which to design an economic system that takes care of the imbalances that seem to thrive in the present capitalistic system?

The potential for me is to recognize that same population has very bright minds(young and upcoming and the aged :) who are not just part of the educational system but reside quietly in the populace,  unaware as a potential resource, while innovative,  are just happy to share some of their ideas..

Researching amongst reputable scientists has allowed me to access the process of accountability as to the evolution of ideas. The capabilities needed in terms of finalizing the recognition of that creativity that resides in and when society has been taken care of, allows art and science to excel.  The livelihoods can allow that potential as an environment conducive to further evolution of our societies.

Of course I have much to learn and am open to furthering my education.

Spectrum Spectrum's picture

Fidel...we might want to shine a light on it all. :)

All of this is a recognition of what must take place not only within our societies as to the questions of being as to what we want built in the substructure(underlying as a unconscious direction of our reality movement in production of being) as a conscious movement toward the development of those same societies. This sense of being personally ad culturallly "project outward."

If you are not aware of what is the undercurrent of the being as a person....what troubles it as it sleeps,  then what say you about the direction this subconscious minds takes as it display's it's warning for you. This dreaming reality predictor of what is to come. Not to take heed of the warning of our culture and the deep seated want for a fairer and just culture. The being,  as to progress the soul's desire for meaning and expressionism, as to learn and evolve?

Spectrum Spectrum's picture

Click on Image for direct link

TELUS Announces Winner of Critter Contest

Telus's New Critter Selection?

Northern Saw-Whet Owl

Quote:
The Northern Saw-Whet Owl makes a repeated tooting whistle sound. Some say they sound like a saw being sharpened on a whetstone.[5] They usually make these sounds to find a mate.

Fidel

Thanks Spectrum. A lot of reading here. The first socialist internet was dismantled and buried in the four corners, I think, because it represented a threat to the propaganda about socialism. An economy based on feedback systems mimicking those of the human body sounded too much like pure democracy. For the Chicago boyz, Milton Friedman and the CIA, the free market system provided all the feedback necessary to those running things. And let's face it, that's the extent to which people are defined in their version of free market system - we're just consumers and purchasers of goods and services and nothing more. Talk of anything more democratic than that is considered heresy.

Spectrum Spectrum's picture

Quote:

10 Things to Know About the Move to IPv6

The Internet has been rolling along for decades on the strength of IPv4 and its numbering system, which has supplied billions of addresses. As long as more addresses were available, few people thought about them. But the booming popularity of the Internet has finally soaked up nearly all those fresh numbers: In February, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) allocated the last of its unused large blocks of IPv4 addresses to regional Internet registries. On Wednesday, World IPv6 Day will turn the new protocol on at hundreds of companies, agencies and universities for testing. Suddenly, IT administrators and consumers alike are starting to think more about IP addresses. Here are the answers to a few questions about the numbers that make the Internet work.

Spectrum Spectrum's picture

 

List of Participants

Quote:
The following organisations are joining the Internet Society in actively participating in World IPv6 Day.

This page lists companies who have made public commitments to participate in this event and links to any material they may be offering to accompany their participation. Check back here for updates with additional details on participants in this event.

On June 8 the websites listed here will offer their content over IPv6. We will display a status dashboard indicating the IPv6 status.

Spectrum Spectrum's picture

Rural B.C. businesses and families get broadband boost

Quote:

 

VICTORIA – Premier Christy Clark announced today the Province is providing $2.34 million to expand Internet service to families in over 60 locales in rural B.C.

“Bringing Internet access to our most rural areas is crucial for the future of our young people and their education, for the health of families and for the competitiveness of our businesses,” said Premier Clark. “Not only does it help give British Columbians better access to information and opportunity, but it also brings that information closer and faster to our youngest learners.”

Premier Christy Clark promised to expand broadband Internet into B.C.’s rural communities and make B.C. one of the most connected jurisdictions in the world.

 

 

Since 2008, the Province has provided $6.83 million through Network BC’s Connecting Citizen’s Grant Program and funded nearly 150 connectivity projects to establish the infrastructure needed to bring high-speed Internet services to over 210 new locales in B.C. Today, 93 per cent of British Columbians have access to high-speed Internet.

“This year, we are providing more money for connectivity projects in B.C. than ever before,” said Stephanie Cadieux, Minister of Labour, Citizens’ Services and Open Government. “By investing in 51 new projects, we will help bring health and education opportunities, local business development, and job creation and training to thousands of people living in B.C.’s smallest communities.”

With these grants, more families, businesses and individuals will soon have access to high-speed Internet services for the first time. The provincial government is committed to creating new economic opportunities for families by expanding broadband into their communities.

 

Network BC works collaboratively with local community groups, all levels of government and the private sector, including small Internet service providers, to encourage and facilitate high-speed Internet connectivity. To find out more about Network BC, please visit: http://www.network.gov.bc.ca/ 
   
A list of successful projects of the 2010-2011 Connecting Citizens Grant Program is in the attached backgrounder.

Contact:

Chris Olsen
Press Secretary
Office of the Premier
604 220-1640

Melody Wey
Public Affairs Officer
Ministry of Labour, Citizens’ Services and Open Government
250 508-5030

 

Spectrum Spectrum's picture

 

Can technology provide a better solution than ITMPs?

 

 

Quote:

 

At the NCTA 2011 Cable show in Chicago (June 14-16), broadband service provider ARRIS demonstrated how it can undertake a 4.5 Gigabits per second file transfer after an upgrade to their existing DOCSIS cable systems, which could in turn strengthen the viability of HFC. If you’re like me and need Wikipedia to understand that sentence, let alone the press release, then let me try and break it down for you.

 

 

Optical fibre has a higher bandwidth and therefore has a higher information carrying capacity than cable does. People often point to it as a technical solution to Internet traffic problems (as opposed to a regulatory solution). Although optical fibre itself is less expensive than the copper wire that cable uses, building new

 

Essentially, ARRIS is combining 128 cable channels to act as a single lane for data to travel through. This demonstration shows how, instead of building expensive new infrastructure, ARRIS and other service providers can update and invest in existing infrastructure to improve bandwidth. ARRIS’s actions also demonstrate that coaxial cable does not have to become obsolete (HFC = a broadband network that uses both optical fibre and coaxial cable).

 

 

Canadian Internet connection speeds lag behind former Eastern Bloc countries such as Romania and the Czech Republic. Big telecom companies insist that the best way to ensure adequate Internet speed and service is through Internet traffic management practices. According to big telecom, economic ITMPs (e.g. usage-based billing) and technical ITMPs (e.g. throttling) curb congestion and improve Internet speed and service. Big telecom claims that infrastructure investment is costly and ineffective.

 

 

Yet as OpenMedia.ca’s recent report, Casting an Open Net, explains, not only has infrastructure investment been proven as the best solution to network congestion and slow speeds, the CRTC dictates that ISPs must prove that infrastructure investment has been exhausted as a solution before resorting to ITMPs.

 

This is not the case in Canada’s Internet service market and so if ARRIS’ experiment is successful, it further reinforces OpenMedia.ca’s thesis, that it is possible for ISPs to meet projected growth rates through infrastructure upgrades. In the past, technological developments in speed and efficiency have matched growth in Internet traffic. This seems to be an indicator that they will continue to do so.

 

See:Can technology provide a better solution than ITMPs? as well Front Page



See alsoBuilding Community Broadband Networks

 

Quote:

The real issues, however, are not about the sheer size of the Big Four, but their market power. Between them, Bell, Shaw, Rogers and QMI control:

  • 86 per cent of cable and satellite distribution
  • 70 per cent of wireless revenues
  • 63 per cent of the wired telephone market
  • 49 per cent of Internet Service Provider revenues
  • 42 per cent of radio
  • 40 per cent of the television universe
  • 19 per cent of the newspaper and magazine markets
  • 60 per cent of total revenues from all of the above media sectors combined.

That, by any standard measure of concentration, constitutes a highly concentrated market.

See: Big media in the hot seat at CRTC hearings

Spectrum Spectrum's picture

Federal Government expenditures in Rural Internet Development in Province of British Columbia.

Across the country, there are over 400 grants that have been paid out, or,  are being paid out into other provincial jurisdictions.

Questions about type of internet connection is relevant and grants paid out must establish grants to private companies and how they are to implement these rural internet connections.

For instance.....

Quote:

A.B.C. Allen Business Communications Ltd.     BC-5950     Vivian lake, Willowcale & Salmon Valley     295     Fixed Wireless
A.B.C. Allen Business Communications Ltd.     BC5970     Bulkley-Nechako Regional District     22     Fixed Wireless

If rural development shows that this company expertise is in Radio Technologies and only can provide internet access if it is in line of sight with towers in the Tabor lake region,  this gives only line of sight devlopement, so this does not make eligibility for access to high speed internet dvelopement so this defeats reasons why internet development money was doled out to this company.

Submission should had already been determined as too,  rural type connection,  and what is only viable as to line of sight internet connections? That wireless is the only means as of this point other(weak signals  from distance of towers) then Explorinet as satellite capabilities, which is very slow. These services are not suitable as too consideration of high speed capabilities?

Community based development seems to be inundated, with the proposals by Progressive and Liberal governments to provide grant money, seems to squash the "community broadband based municipalities developments for considerations, as not viable,"  other then the control by the big four monopolies?

 

Quote:

British Columbia
26 active projects
Approximately 13,810 households

Note: The projects below include conditionally approved and projects for which funding has been confirmed.
Projects may be in various state of completion.

Information current as of February 17, 2011 and subject to change.

Projects by Province — British Columbia Company     GSA     Region     Approximate number of households that will be able to receive service     Technology

A.B.C. Allen Business Communications Ltd.     BC-5950     Vivian lake, Willowcale & Salmon Valley     295     Fixed Wireless
A.B.C. Allen Business Communications Ltd.     BC5970     Bulkley-Nechako Regional District     22     Fixed Wireless
Base Technology Ltd.     BC-5920     Pemberton Meadows     56     Fixed Wireless
Cybernet Communications Ltd.     BC-5960     Smithers Topley     389     Fixed Wireless
Cybernet Communications Ltd.     BC-5970     Terrace Hazelton     477     Fixed Wireless
Davinci Broadband     BC-5930B     Hospital Creek and Moberley, north of Golden     421     Fixed Wireless
Douglas First Nation (Xa'xtsa) Band     BC-5920     Port Douglas, Tepella Village     20     Fixed Wireless
FlexiNET Broadband Inc.     BC-5940     From Golden to Cranbrook     1,288     Fixed Wireless
Galaxy Broadband Communications Inc.     BC-5910B     Comox-Strathcona Regional District and Alberni-Clayoquot Regional District     954     Satellite
Galaxy Broadband Communications Inc.     BC-5950     Cariboo Regional District, Fraser-Fort George Regional District excluding Vivian Lake, Willowcale and Salmon Valley     5,683     Satellite
Galaxy Broadband Communications Inc.     BC-5960     Kitimat-Stikine Municipality     1,128     Satellite
Galaxy Broadband Communications Inc.     BC-5980     Goodlow, Northern Rockies, Ware, Blueberry River, Prespatou, Halfway River, Montney, Doig River     621     Satellite
GwaiiTel Society     BC-5960     Queen Charlotte Island     884     Wireline/Wireless
Mascon Cable Systems Inc.     BC-5930B     Quaaout 1 Indian Reserve     20     Wireline
Minto Communications Society     BC-5920     Bridge River Valley     54     Fixed Wireless
Navigata Communications     BC5930B     Thompson-Nicola Regional District     52     Fixed Wireless
Northwestel Inc.     BC-5960     Telegraph Creek and Eddontenajon (Iskut 6)     161     DSL
Northwestel Inc.     BC-5970     Dease Lake 9     13     DSL
Shaw Cablesystems Limited — Beaver Point, Saltspring     BC-5910A     Beaver Point, Saltspring Island     200     Wireline
Shaw Cablesystems Limited — Grand Forks — Nursery     BC-5940     Grand Forks     66     Wireline
Shaw Cablesystems Limited — Lakeview, Arrow Creek     BC-5940     Lakeview, Arrow Creek Rd     183     Wireline
Shaw Cablesystems Limited Shirley Area     BC-5910A     Shirley     160     Wireline
Shaw Cablesystems Limited — Rural Mission     BC-5920     Rural Mission     309     Wireline
Shaw Cablesystems Limited — Stillwater     BC-5910C     Stillwater     106     Wireline
Shaw Cablesystems Limited — Sunshine Valley     BC-5920     Sunshine Valley     67     Wireline
WiiTec Solutions Ltd.     BC-5930B     Parsons     181     Fixed Wireless

Spectrum Spectrum's picture

Quote:
Given the critical role it plays for communication, culture and commerce, most people now recognize the importance of Internet access. A new report for the United Nations Human Rights Council takes Internet access a step further, however, characterizing it as a human right.

The report, written by the UN Special Rapporteur on the promotion and protection of the right to freedom of opinion and expression Frank La Rue (an internationally regarded human rights expert who was once nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize), took the political world by storm when it was released several weeks ago.

The report explored not only the need to ensure that citizens have Internet connectivity, but also the rules associated with that access. As a result, the report was highly critical of policies that block access to content, threaten to cut off Internet access due to allegations of copyright infringement, and fail to safeguard online privacy.Is Internet Access a Human Right? By Michael Geist, 21 Jun 2011, TheTyee.ca

[/i]

Spectrum Spectrum's picture

Report of the Special Rapporteur on the
promotion and protection of the right to freedom
of opinion and expression, Frank La Rue*

Quote:
61. The term “digital divide” refers to the gap between people with effective access to
digital and information technologies, in particular the Internet, and those with very limited
or no access at all. In contrast to 71.6 Internet users per 100 inhabitants in developed States,
there are only 21.1 Internet users per 100 inhabitants in developing States.41 This disparity
is starker in the African region, with only 9.6 users per 100 inhabitants.42 In addition, digital
divides also exist along wealth, gender, geographical and social lines within States. Indeed,
with wealth being one of the significant factors in determining who can access information
communication technologies, Internet access is likely to be concentrated among socioeconomic
elites, particularly in countries where Internet penetration is low. In addition,
people in rural areas are often confronted with obstacles to Internet access, such as lack of
technological availability, slower Internet connection, and/or higher costs.
Furthermore,
even where Internet connection is available, disadvantaged groups, such as persons with
disabilities and persons belonging to minority groups, often face barriers to accessing the
Internet in a way that is meaningful, relevant and useful to them in their daily lives.

Bold added as emphasis, is not to underscore following statement to disabilties with regard to disadvantage groups, and minority groups. There is a reason it was choosen.

remind remind's picture

Not sure what you are asking here?

Spectrum Spectrum's picture

remind wrote:

Not sure what you are asking here?

 

As you can see there has been much interest on my part about communications. The necessity of advancement of society through communicative means.

Why must we as a society be permissible only to "such advancements" through such a personal cost? Any cost.

We created libraries. Do you charge a subscription fee( heaven forbid I mention it)? Do we discriminate between rural and city dwellers as too,  access to information, by location?

Yes, I want to shake it all up. It's not right.

It means looking a the way we communicate much differently. No gatekeepers(throttling and speed control as well as information) and as to what you can look for? I am not talking about (pornography or insidious efforts to criminalize our society), but of educational efforts to better oneself?

remind remind's picture

Agree with that, as I live rural and can only get dial up,  @ 24kb,  means I am regulated to what I can easily access, or access at all. Should we attempt to get a dish to try and see if we can get high speed, or actually higher speed, reception it will cost 300.00 up front, then 50/month. If we get no reception, given the mountains and positioning, then we will be out 160.00 as they will give back 140.00 if not able to get linkage.

But we don't look for urbanites to help us with our internet plight as it would be a fool's errand.

 

And given that this style of communications will only last as long as there is no extreme solar activity, perhaps we should be looking at more stable communication and hydro electric transfer systems?

Spectrum Spectrum's picture

Quote:

Radio spectrum: a vital resource in a wireless world

Radio spectrum is an essential resource underpinning one of Europe’s most dynamic sectors: wireless communications. As well as telecommunications, wireless technologies support services in areas as diverse as transport, security and environmental protection. But the spectrum is a finite resource so its allocation requires effective and efficient coordination at European (and global) level.

What is Radio Spectrum

Europe 2020 Strategy and the Digital Agenda for Europe

Would such a large push in Digital Agenda in effect squash and over ride any attempts by UN toward right and freedoms of expression through the internet? France?

Spectrum Spectrum's picture

remind wrote:

Agree with that, as I live rural and can only get dial up,  @ 24kb,  means I am regulated to what I can easily access, or access at all. Should we attempt to get a dish to try and see if we can get high speed, or actually higher speed, reception it will cost 300.00 up front, then 50/month. If we get no reception, given the mountains and positioning, then we will be out 160.00 as they will give back 140.00 if not able to get linkage.

Does a cell phone work in your area? If yes, wireless.

remind wrote:
But we don't look for urbanites to help us with our internet plight as it would be a fool's errand.

I usually don't distinguish on people themselves as to locations,  just that "equal access" expresses "no differences" by choice of location.

 

remind wrote:
And given that this style of communications will only last as long as there is no extreme solar activity, perhaps we should be looking at more stable communication and hydro electric transfer systems?<

Ha ha... of course we have been talking about the affects.....so community based broadband systems based on fiber optics as to speed.  Interesting question.....Not sure if that would have an affect on the signal communications, as it would on wireless?

Spectrum Spectrum's picture

Our government thought to auction off "spectrum allocations" in the understanding that the switch from analog to digital take place by the end of Aug. Any thoughts on this, or related technological development with regard to the those spaces for internet connectivity?

The thought here is that since our government thought to auction off a space that was inherently free(government owns it, okay) to consumers with regard to TV technologies has been shifted to a method by which companies may profit off individuals, why is that space not allocated to a development of a free internet access? A Community Broad Band development system that meets the right and freedoms of the UN report?

Any Contradictions here?

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Wireless Access points

One IEEE 802.11 WAP can typically communicate with 30 client systems located within a radius of 100 m.[citation needed] However, the actual range of communication can vary significantly, depending on such variables as indoor or outdoor placement, height above ground, nearby obstructions, other electronic devices that might actively interfere with the signal by broadcasting on the same frequency, type of antenna, the current weather, operating radio frequency, and the power output of devices. Network designers can extend the range of WAPs through the use of repeaters and reflectors, which can bounce or amplify radio signals that ordinarily would go un-received. In experimental conditions, wireless networking has operated over distances of several hundred kilometers.[1]

Development of Radio Technologies and the internet. Line of sight? Anybody see a contradiction here? Government grants for rural development?

 

Spectrum Spectrum's picture

I am wondering if I am mixing things up a bit here in terms allocation of spectrum for cell phone companies and what has been auctioned.

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There is certainly a lot less confusion going around these days over the upcoming transition to digital television on August 31 than there was a few years ago. Unfortunately, a good portion of the public, namely those who have become perfectly content with their expensive cable and satellite packages, seem to be completely unaware of why this is so important. Anyone who thinks that picking up television signals for free with an antenna is a lowly, vestigial practice from the Cold War could certainly learn a lot from the growing number of Canadians embracing it, as well as the countries using it for innovation in mobile phone technology.

Over-the-air television is not outdated. In fact, Canada is one of the only countries where people (specifically in urban areas) have been completely and utterly brainwashed into believing that they must subscribe to cable or satellite services in order to watch television in any acceptable capacity. Many Canadians have forgotten that they are supposed to have free access to television signals, and over-the-air broadcasting is fundamental to ensuring that right.

See: Why You Should Care About Digital OTA Television

Spectrum Spectrum's picture

Of course it is important to understand that such integration is sought by forces within Canada as to the larger agenda of the EU?

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Mr Sarkozy reflected this attitude in a speech he gave last year.

"The internet is the new frontier, a territory to conquer. But it cannot be a Wild West. It cannot be a lawless place, where people are allowed to pillage artistic works with no limits," Mr Sarkozy said. Sarkozy to host key internet forum ahead of G8 summit

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However, I am opposed to the full-court press that is now coming from three directions that aim to turn ISPs and search engines from being ‘gateways’ to the Internet to ‘gatekeepers’.See Also: Global Internet Regulation: Tightening the Screws?

(link in article added by me with regard to Gatekeepers)

What policies there in discussion would have you believe that such security application sought by France would not have been an ultimate goal here in Canada?

Digital Agenda Scoreboard

Digital Agenda Scoreboard

Larger Image in Document.

 

Is really a push from the US?

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