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B.C. Women's Marches should spark a movement for justice here, too.

Yesterday it felt good to be one of thousands marching in B.C. to challenge the misogynist rhetoric of a narcissistic president. It was cathartic to walk with so many whose protest was displayed on signs philosophic and poetic all around the planet, from Alaska to Antarctica.

But today, when I think about what is happening in our own province, I wonder when we will see thousands take to the streets to protest the egregious actions of the B.C. Liberal government and Christy Clark?

While big money gets to feast at her table, children with learning disabilities struggle to keep up with lessons in mouldy portables, waiting for the crumbs she was so "excited" to promise.

While 914 dead bodies pile up in morgues, she ignores the health crisis in our streets, refusing the common sense solutions suggested. 

While people are turned away from clinics and waiting in emergency rooms starts at 3 hours, she flits around the province meeting with billionaires who benefit from tax cuts.

While youth who have aged-out of care die alone on the street, and while teens in government care  "fall" out of windows in hotel rooms, she grins at more funding-by-photo-op events.

And lets never forget that there is an entire generation of students who were subjected to overcrowded classrooms and decreasing resources while, for 15 years, her government spent millions in attacks on the constitutional rights of teachers. 

This list could go on and on. There are over a 146 examples of the B.C. Liberals' callous disregard for ordinary citizens in this province.

But, where is the outrage?

People around the planet are afraid that Trump will reverse all progress to mitigate the effects of climate change, while here in B.C., alarm bells warning about increasing fossil fuel emissions with LNG are largely ignored.

Yesterday, parents around the world marched with their children, future citizens, who will inherit the world we leave them, while here in B.C. the fact that one in five children lives in poverty seems to not be enough to demand more of a government whose "families first" campaign slogan rang hollow.

We seem to be dazzled by the ads promising us a world of opportunities while all around us the suffering of the sick, the poor, the disabled and the elderly at the hands of Christy Clark's crew barely registers acknowledgement.

The seed for yesterday's march was planted by Teresa Shook, a grandmother who refused to allow her despair about Trump’s election victory to lull her into apathy. She wrote on her Facebook page: "I think we should march."

What words will it take to shake the citizens of B.C. out of their apathy?

Image credit: Flickr/moja2

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